Books – Titles A-Z

  • A Very Remarkable Sickness

    Epidemics in the Petit Nord, 1670 to 1846

    Paul Hackett (Author)

    Although new diseases had first arrived in the New World in the 16th century, by the end of the 17th century shorter transoceanic travel time meant that a far greater number of diseases survived the journey from Europe and were still able to infect new communities. These acute, directly transmitted infectious diseases – including smallpox, influenza, and measles — would be responsible for a monumental loss of life and would forever transform North American Aboriginal communities. Historical geographer Paul Hackett meticulously traces the diffusion of these diseases from Europe through central Canada to the West.

    Published November 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Medical History

  • Aboriginal Resource Use in Canada

    Historical and Legal Aspects

    Kerry Abel (Editor), Jean Friesen (Editor)

    Addresses a wide range of topics related to Aboriginal resource use, ranging from the pre-contact period to the present.

    Published January 1991 | Critical Studies in Native History, Environmental Studies, History, Indigenous Studies

  • After Identity

    Mennonite Writing in North America

    Robert Zacharias (Editor)

    Mennonite writing through the lens of identity.

    Published March 2016 | Ethnic Studies, Literary Criticism

  • Alien Heart

    The Life and Work of Margaret Laurence

    Lyall Powers (Author)

    Margaret Laurence remains one of Canada’s best-known and most beloved writers. Twice winner of the Governor General’s Award for fiction, she was, as the late William French wrote, “more profoundly admired than any other Canadian novelist of her generation.” Alien Heart is the first full-length biography of Margaret Laurence that combines personal knowledge and insights of the woman with a study of her work, which often paralleled the events and concerns in her own life.

    Published August 2005 | Literary Criticism

  • All Our Changes

    Images from the Sixties Generation

    Gerry Kopelow (Author)

    All Our Changes is a stunning collection of 160 black and white photographs taken between 1968 and 1970. These images capture the innocence and earnestness of the early Canadian hippie movement, from political protests and speakers’ corners, to Festival Express and the Mariposa Folk Festival. Joni Mitchell is here, as are the Guess Who, but so are everyday kids hitching rides, hanging out, and, one by one, forever changing the Canadian political and cultural landscape.

    Published September 2009 | Art & Architecture

  • Apostate Englishman

    Grey Owl the Writer and the Myths

    Albert Braz (Author)

    A critical assessment of Archie Belaney seen through his writings as Grey Owl.

    Published September 2015 | Literary Criticism

  • Arapaho Historical Traditions

    Hinono’einoo3itoono

    Paul Moss (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator), Alonzo Moss Sr. (Translator)

    Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), a highly respected storyteller and ceremonial leader, these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. As works of an oral tradition, they had until now remained beyond the reach of those who do not speak the Arapaho language.

    Published August 2005 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • As Long as the Rivers Run

    Hydroelectric Development and Native Communities

    James B. Waldram (Author)

    Waldram examines the politics of hydroelectric dam construction in the Canadian northwest, focussing on the negotiations and agreements between the developers and the Native residents. He shows the parallels between the treatment of Natives by the government of Canada in these negotiations and the treaty process a century earlier.

    Published October 1993 | Indigenous Studies

  • Attorney for the Frontier

    Enos Stutsmon

    Dale Gibson (Author), Lee Gibson (Author), Cameron Harvey (Author)

    The purpose of this biography is to bring to public attention the importance of the contributions made by Enos Stutsman, an American, to the history of the province and the Northwest generally. It also attempts to impress and entertain the reader by highlighting Stutsman’s personal qualities.

    Published January 1983 | History

  • Centering Anishinaabeg Studies

    Understanding the World Through Stories

    Jill Doerfler (Editor), Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (Editor), Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair (Editor)

    A foundational text for understanding the field of Aboriginal Studies.

    Published March 2013 | History, Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism, Literature