Books

  • Laws of Early Iceland, Gragas I

    Andrew Dennis (Translator), Peter Foote (Translator), Richard Perkins (Translator)

    The laws of Mediaeval Iceland provide detailed and fascinating insight into the society that produced the Icelandic sagas. Known collectively as Gragas (Greygoose), this great legal code offers a wealth of information about early European legal systems and the society of the Middles Ages. This first translation of Gragas is in two volumes.

    Published January 2007 | University of Manitoba Icelandic Studies, Icelandic Studies

  • North American Icelandic

    The Life of a Language

    Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir (Author)

    North American Icelandic evolved mainly in Icelandic settlements in Manitoba and North Dakota and is the only version of Icelandic that is not spoken in Iceland. But North American Icelandic is a dying language with few left who speak it. North American Icelandic: The Life of a Language is the only book about the nature and development of this variety of Icelandic.

    Published December 2006 | Icelandic Studies

  • The New Buffalo

    The Struggle for Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada

    Blair Stonechild (Author)

    Post-secondary education, often referred to as “the new buffalo,” is a contentious but critically important issue for First Nations and the future of Canadian society. In The New Buffalo, Blair Stonechild traces the history of Aboriginal post-secondary education policy from its earliest beginnings as a government tool for assimilation and cultural suppression to its development as means of Aboriginal self-determination and self-government.

    Published October 2006 | Education, Indigenous Studies

  • A Great Restlessness

    The Life and Politics of Dorise Nielsen

    Faith Johnston (Author)

    Dorise Nielsen was a pioneering feminist, a radical politician, the first Communist elected to Canada’s House of Commons, and the only woman elected in 1940. But despite her remarkable career, until now little has been known about her.

    Published October 2006 | History, Political Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Winnipeg Modern

    Architecture, 1945 to 1975

    Serena Keshavjee (Editor)

    Winnipeg Modern captures the grace and beauty of the Modernist period and includes critical and historical essays on the aesthetic and social project of Modernist architecture in Winnipeg. Lavishly illustrated with 300 photographs from provincial archives, the private archives of architect Henry Kalen, and contemporary photographer Martin Tessler, this book is a testament to the Modernist principles of structural expression and purity of form.

    Published September 2006 | Art & Architecture

  • The Force of Vocation

    The Literary Career of Adele Wiseman

    Ruth Panofsky (Author)

    Adele Wiseman was a seminal figure in Canadian letters. Always independent and wilful, she charted her own literary career, based on her unfailing belief in her artistic vision. In The Force of Vocation, the first book on Wisemanís writing life, Ruth Panofsky presents Wiseman as a writer who doggedly and ambitiously perfected her craft, sought a wide audience for her work, and refused to compromise her work for marketability.

    Published April 2006 | Literary Criticism

  • Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood

    Europe - Russia - Canada, 1525 to 1980

    James Urry (Author)

    Mennonites and their forebears are usually thought to be a people with little interest or involvement in politics. Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood reveals that since their early history, Mennonites have, in fact, been active participants in worldly politics.

    Published February 2006 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • St. John’s College

    Faith and Education in Western Canada

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Winnipeg’s St. John’s College is one of the oldest educational institutions in western Canada. Its roots go back to the Red River Settlement in the 1850s when it first began as a school for the English-speaking children of the employees of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Following the college through its many permutations, J.M. Bumsted provides a fascinating history of the birth and growth of post-secondary education in western Canada.

    Published December 2005 | History

  • Winnipeg 1912

    Jim Blanchard (Author)

    At the beginning of the last century, no city on the continent was growing faster or was more aggressive than Winnipeg. No year in the city’s history epitomized this energy more that 1912, when Winnipeg was on the crest of a period of unprecedented prosperity. From the excited crowds at the summer Exhibition to the turbulent floor of the Grain Exchange, Blanchard gives us a vivid picture of daily life in this fast-paced city of new millionaires and newly arrived immigrants. Richly illustrated with more than seventy period photographs, Winnipeg 1912 captures a time and place that left a lasting impression on Canadian history and culture.

    Published October 2005 | History

  • Like the Sound of a Drum

    Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut

    Peter Kulchyski (Author)

    In Like the Sound of a Drum, Peter Kulchyski brings new primary research and contemporary political theory to the study of Aboriginal politics in Denendeh and Nunavut. He looks as three northern communities — Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut — and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence.

    Published October 2005 | Contemporary Studies on the North, Indigenous Studies, Political Studies