Books

  • Magic Weapons

    Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School

    Sam McKegney (Author)

    Magic Weapons is the first major survey of Indigenous writings on the residential school system, and provides groundbreaking readings of life writings by Rita Joe (Mi’kmaq) and Anthony Apakark Thrasher (Inuit) as well as in-depth critical studies of better known life writings by Basil Johnston (Ojibway) and Tomson Highway (Cree).

    Published November 2007 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • The North End

    Photographs by John Paskievich

    John Paskievich (Author)

    Winnipeg’s North End has informed the Canadian mythology and influenced the national psyche. The North End also divides and defines the city of Winnipeg, shaping its politics and sense of identity. In these photographs, taken between the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, John Paskievich set out to explore the North End he knew in his youth.

    Published October 2007 | Art & Architecture

  • Constructing Tomorrow’s Federalism

    New Perspectives on Canadian Governance

    Ian Peach (Editor)

    From discussions on democracy and distinctiveness to explorations of self-governance and power imbalances, Constructing Tomorrow’s Federalism tests assertions from scholars and practitioners on the legitimacy and future of the state of the federation. In this broad collection of essays, fifteen scholars and political leaders identify options for the future governance of Canada and contribute to a renewed civic discourse on what it means to govern ourselves as a liberal democracy and a multinational federation.

    Published May 2007 | Political Studies

  • My Parents

    Memoirs of New World Icelanders

    Birna Bjarnadottir (Editor), Finnbogi Gudmundsson (Editor)

    My Parents: Memoirs of New World Icelanders is a collection of essays written by second-generation Icelandic immigrants in North America, describing the lives of their parents. A prevailing sense of community emerges from the writers’ stories, showing how Icelandic culture and tradition sustained the immigrants through hardship, illness, and isolation. My Parents also details some of the genealogy of the New World Icelanders who settled in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Wisconsin, North Dakota, and Minnesota.

    Published April 2007 | Icelandic Studies

  • A History of the Old Icelandic Commonwealth

    Islendinga Saga

    Jon Johannesson (Author)

    The founding of the Old Icelandic Commonwealth in 930 A.D. is one of the most significant events in the history of early Western Europe. This pioneering work of historiography provides a comprehensive history of Iceland from 870 A.D. to the end of the Commonwealth in 1262.

    Published January 2007 | University of Manitoba Icelandic Studies, Icelandic Studies

  • The Book of Settlements

    Landnámabók

    Herman Pálsson (Translator), Paul Edwards (Translator)

    Iceland was the last country in Europe to become inhabited, and we know more about the beginnings and early history of Icelandic society than we do of any other in the Old World. This world is vividly recounted in The Book of Settlements, first compiled by the first Icelandic historians in the thirteenth century. It describes in detail individuals’ daily life during the Icelandic Age of Settlement.

    Published January 2007 | University of Manitoba Icelandic Studies, Icelandic Studies

  • Laws of Early Iceland, Gragas I

    Andrew Dennis (Translator), Peter Foote (Translator), Richard Perkins (Translator)

    The laws of Mediaeval Iceland provide detailed and fascinating insight into the society that produced the Icelandic sagas. Known collectively as Gragas (Greygoose), this great legal code offers a wealth of information about early European legal systems and the society of the Middles Ages. This first translation of Gragas is in two volumes.

    Published January 2007 | University of Manitoba Icelandic Studies, Icelandic Studies

  • North American Icelandic

    The Life of a Language

    Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir (Author)

    North American Icelandic evolved mainly in Icelandic settlements in Manitoba and North Dakota and is the only version of Icelandic that is not spoken in Iceland. But North American Icelandic is a dying language with few left who speak it. North American Icelandic: The Life of a Language is the only book about the nature and development of this variety of Icelandic.

    Published December 2006 | Icelandic Studies

  • The New Buffalo

    The Struggle for Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada

    Blair Stonechild (Author)

    Post-secondary education, often referred to as “the new buffalo,” is a contentious but critically important issue for First Nations and the future of Canadian society. In The New Buffalo, Blair Stonechild traces the history of Aboriginal post-secondary education policy from its earliest beginnings as a government tool for assimilation and cultural suppression to its development as means of Aboriginal self-determination and self-government.

    Published October 2006 | Education, Indigenous Studies

  • A Great Restlessness

    The Life and Politics of Dorise Nielsen

    Faith Johnston (Author)

    Dorise Nielsen was a pioneering feminist, a radical politician, the first Communist elected to Canada’s House of Commons, and the only woman elected in 1940. But despite her remarkable career, until now little has been known about her.

    Published October 2006 | History, Political Studies, Women’s Studies