Books

  • Winnipeg Modern

    Architecture, 1945 to 1975

    Serena Keshavjee (Editor)

    Winnipeg Modern captures the grace and beauty of the Modernist period and includes critical and historical essays on the aesthetic and social project of Modernist architecture in Winnipeg. Lavishly illustrated with 300 photographs from provincial archives, the private archives of architect Henry Kalen, and contemporary photographer Martin Tessler, this book is a testament to the Modernist principles of structural expression and purity of form.

    Published September 2006 | Art & Architecture

  • The Force of Vocation

    The Literary Career of Adele Wiseman

    Ruth Panofsky (Author)

    Adele Wiseman was a seminal figure in Canadian letters. Always independent and wilful, she charted her own literary career, based on her unfailing belief in her artistic vision. In The Force of Vocation, the first book on Wisemanís writing life, Ruth Panofsky presents Wiseman as a writer who doggedly and ambitiously perfected her craft, sought a wide audience for her work, and refused to compromise her work for marketability.

    Published April 2006 | Literary Criticism

  • Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood

    Europe - Russia - Canada, 1525 to 1980

    James Urry (Author)

    Mennonites and their forebears are usually thought to be a people with little interest or involvement in politics. Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood reveals that since their early history, Mennonites have, in fact, been active participants in worldly politics.

    Published February 2006 | Ethnic Studies, History, Mennonite Studies

  • St. John’s College

    Faith and Education in Western Canada

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Winnipeg’s St. John’s College is one of the oldest educational institutions in western Canada. Its roots go back to the Red River Settlement in the 1850s when it first began as a school for the English-speaking children of the employees of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Following the college through its many permutations, J.M. Bumsted provides a fascinating history of the birth and growth of post-secondary education in western Canada.

    Published December 2005 | History

  • Winnipeg 1912

    Jim Blanchard (Author)

    At the beginning of the last century, no city on the continent was growing faster or was more aggressive than Winnipeg. No year in the city’s history epitomized this energy more that 1912, when Winnipeg was on the crest of a period of unprecedented prosperity. From the excited crowds at the summer Exhibition to the turbulent floor of the Grain Exchange, Blanchard gives us a vivid picture of daily life in this fast-paced city of new millionaires and newly arrived immigrants. Richly illustrated with more than seventy period photographs, Winnipeg 1912 captures a time and place that left a lasting impression on Canadian history and culture.

    Published October 2005 | History

  • Like the Sound of a Drum

    Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut

    Peter Kulchyski (Author)

    In Like the Sound of a Drum, Peter Kulchyski brings new primary research and contemporary political theory to the study of Aboriginal politics in Denendeh and Nunavut. He looks as three northern communities — Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut — and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence.

    Published October 2005 | Contemporary Studies on the North, Indigenous Studies, Political Studies

  • Travelling Passions

    The Hidden Life of Vilhjalmur Stefansson

    Gisli Palsson (Author), Keneva Kunz (Translator)

    Vilhjalmur Stefansson has long been known for his groundbreaking work as an anthropologist and expert on Arctic peoples. His three expeditions to the Canadian Arctic in the early 1900s, as well as his expertise in northern anthropology, helped create his public image as an heroic, Hemingway-esque figure in the annals of twentieth-century exploration. Travelling Passions sheds new light on Stefanssonís life and work, focussing on the tension between his private life and the theories that brought his name to the halls of fame.

    Published September 2005 | History

  • Arapaho Historical Traditions

    Hinono’einoo3itoono

    Paul Moss (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator), Alonzo Moss Sr. (Translator)

    Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), a highly respected storyteller and ceremonial leader, these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. As works of an oral tradition, they had until now remained beyond the reach of those who do not speak the Arapaho language.

    Published August 2005 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • Alien Heart

    The Life and Work of Margaret Laurence

    Lyall Powers (Author)

    Margaret Laurence remains one of Canada’s best-known and most beloved writers. Twice winner of the Governor General’s Award for fiction, she was, as the late William French wrote, “more profoundly admired than any other Canadian novelist of her generation.” Alien Heart is the first full-length biography of Margaret Laurence that combines personal knowledge and insights of the woman with a study of her work, which often paralleled the events and concerns in her own life.

    Published August 2005 | Literary Criticism

  • History, Literature and the Writing of the Canadian Prairies

    Alison Calder (Editor), Robert Wardhaugh (Editor)

    The Canadian Prairie has long been represented as a timeless and unchanging location, defined by settlement and landscape. Now, a new generation of writers and historians challenge that perception and argue, instead, that it is a region with an evolving culture and history. This collection of ten essays explores a more contemporary prairie identity, and reconfigures “the prairie” as a construct that is non-linear and diverse, responding to the impact of geographical, historical, and political currents.

    Published May 2005 | History, Literary Criticism