Books

  • Like the Sound of a Drum

    Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut

    Peter Kulchyski (Author)

    In Like the Sound of a Drum, Peter Kulchyski brings new primary research and contemporary political theory to the study of Aboriginal politics in Denendeh and Nunavut. He looks as three northern communities — Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut — and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence.

    Published October 2005 | Contemporary Studies on the North, Indigenous Studies, Political Studies

  • Travelling Passions

    The Hidden Life of Vilhjalmur Stefansson

    Gisli Palsson (Author), Keneva Kunz (Translator)

    Vilhjalmur Stefansson has long been known for his groundbreaking work as an anthropologist and expert on Arctic peoples. His three expeditions to the Canadian Arctic in the early 1900s, as well as his expertise in northern anthropology, helped create his public image as an heroic, Hemingway-esque figure in the annals of twentieth-century exploration. Travelling Passions sheds new light on Stefanssonís life and work, focussing on the tension between his private life and the theories that brought his name to the halls of fame.

    Published September 2005 | History

  • Arapaho Historical Traditions

    Hinono’einoo3itoono

    Paul Moss (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator), Alonzo Moss Sr. (Translator)

    Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), a highly respected storyteller and ceremonial leader, these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. As works of an oral tradition, they had until now remained beyond the reach of those who do not speak the Arapaho language.

    Published August 2005 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • Alien Heart

    The Life and Work of Margaret Laurence

    Lyall Powers (Author)

    Margaret Laurence remains one of Canada’s best-known and most beloved writers. Twice winner of the Governor General’s Award for fiction, she was, as the late William French wrote, “more profoundly admired than any other Canadian novelist of her generation.” Alien Heart is the first full-length biography of Margaret Laurence that combines personal knowledge and insights of the woman with a study of her work, which often paralleled the events and concerns in her own life.

    Published August 2005 | Literary Criticism

  • History, Literature and the Writing of the Canadian Prairies

    Alison Calder (Editor), Robert Wardhaugh (Editor)

    The Canadian Prairie has long been represented as a timeless and unchanging location, defined by settlement and landscape. Now, a new generation of writers and historians challenge that perception and argue, instead, that it is a region with an evolving culture and history. This collection of ten essays explores a more contemporary prairie identity, and reconfigures “the prairie” as a construct that is non-linear and diverse, responding to the impact of geographical, historical, and political currents.

    Published May 2005 | History, Literary Criticism

  • Travelling Knowledges

    Positioning the Im/Migrant Reader of Aboriginal Literatures in Canada

    Renate Eigenbrod (Author)

    In the context of de/colonization, the boundary between an Aboriginal text and the analysis by a non-Aboriginal outsider poses particular challenges often constructed as unbridgeable. Eigenbrod argues that politically correct silence is not the answer but instead does a disservice to the literature that, like all literature, depends on being read, taught, and disseminated in various ways. In Travelling Knowledges, Eigenbrod suggests decolonizing strategies when approaching Aboriginal texts as an outsider and challenges conventional notions of expertise.

    Published May 2005 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • Intimate Strangers

    The Letters of Margaret Laurence and Gabrielle Roy

    Margaret Laurence (Author), Gabrielle Roy (Author), Paul G. Socken (Editor)

    In 1976 Margaret Laurence and Gabrielle Roy began a seven-year correspondence in English, when both were at the height of their powers as writers. In these lovely and intimate letters, two great Canadian writers discuss everything from their common prairie backgrounds to current politics and censorship.

    Published December 2004 | Literary Criticism

  • One Man’s Documentary

    A Memoir of the Early Years of the National Film Board

    Graham McInnes (Author), Gene Walz (Author)

    One Man’s Documentary is a lively account of one of the most exciting periods in Canadian filmmaking. With style and verve, McInnes paints vivid portraits of Grierson and the others who helped make the NFB an international institution. Film historian Gene Walz’s introduction gives a full picture of the early history of the NFB as well as an account of McInnes’s fascinating life.

    Published November 2004 | Film & Media Studies

  • Rural Life

    Portraits of the Prairie Town, 1946

    James P. Giffen (Author), Gerald Friesen (Editor)

    In the 1940s, the Manitoba Royal Commission on Adult Education investigated directions for the modernization of the province in the post-war era of change. The commission engaged Jim Giffen, then a young sociologist from the University of Toronto, to undertake a detailed field study of three rural Manitoba towns — Carman, Elgin, and Rossburn — in this context. Giffen looks at characteristics such as leadership in the community, ethnic differences, hierarchy of roles, participation in organizations, and aims and activities of young people. Friesen’s postscript provides a wider context to this study, and an assessment of what these differences and commonalities meant to the province.

    Published October 2004 | History

  • Formidable Heritage

    Manitoba’s North and the Cost of Development, 1870 to 1930

    Jim Mochoruk (Author)

    Although climate and geography make our northern condition apparent, Canadians often forget about the north and its problems. Nevertheless, for the generation of historians that included Lower, Creighton, and Morton, the northern rivers, lakes, forests, and plains were often seen as primary characters in the drama of nation building. Jim Mochoruk shows how government and business worked together to transform what had been the exclusive fur-trading preserve of the Hudson’s Bay Company into an industrial hinterland.

    Published June 2004 | History