Books

  • Reporting the Resistance

    Alexander Begg and Joseph Hargrave on the Red River Resistance

    Alexander Begg (Author), J.M. Bumsted (Editor)

    Reporting the Resistance brings together two first-person accounts to give a view “from the ground” of the developments that shocked Canada and created the province of Manitoba. In 1869 and 1870, Begg and Hargrave were regular correspondents for the Toronto Globe and the Montreal Herald. They describe, often from very different perspectives, the events of the resistance, as well as give insider accounts of the social and political background. Largely unreprinted until now, this correspondence remains a relatively untapped resource for contemporary views of the resistance. These are the Red River’s own accounts, and are often quite different from the perspective of eastern observers.

    Published December 2003 | History

  • Providence Watching

    Journeys from Wartorn Poland to the Canadian Prairies

    Kazimierz Patalas (Editor), Zbigniew Izydorczyk (Translator)

    At the start of the Second World War, Poland was invaded by both the German and the Soviet armies. After the war, Canada accepted over 4000 Polish immigrant soldiers and their families who did not want to return to a communist regime in their country. This book is a moving oral history of the experiences of forty-five individuals during that transition period between the outbreak of war and their eventual relocation in Canada.

    Published December 2003 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • Writing Grief

    Margaret Laurence and the Work of Mourning

    Christian Riegel (Author)

    Margaret Laurence’s much admired Manawaka fiction — The Stone Angel, A Jest of God, The Fire-Dwellers, A Bird in the House, and The Diviners -– has achieved remarkable recognition for its compassionate portrayal of the attempt to find meaning and peace in ordinary life. In Writing Grief, Christian Riegel argues that the protagonists in these books achieve resolution through acts of mourning, placing this fiction within the larger tradition of writing that explores the nuances and strategies of mourning.

    Published September 2003 | Literary Criticism

  • Making Ends Meet

    Farm Women’s Work in Manitoba

    Charlotte van de Vorst (Author)

    Based on hundreds of interviews with Manitoba farm men and women, Making Ends Meet reconstructs the common history shared by modern farm women as well as by their mothers and grandmothers. It explores women’s changing roles on the farm, from the early days of the Red River settlement to the twentieth-century farm community.

    Published December 2002 | History, Women’s Studies

  • A Very Remarkable Sickness

    Epidemics in the Petit Nord, 1670 to 1846

    Paul Hackett (Author)

    Although new diseases had first arrived in the New World in the 16th century, by the end of the 17th century shorter transoceanic travel time meant that a far greater number of diseases survived the journey from Europe and were still able to infect new communities. These acute, directly transmitted infectious diseases – including smallpox, influenza, and measles — would be responsible for a monumental loss of life and would forever transform North American Aboriginal communities. Historical geographer Paul Hackett meticulously traces the diffusion of these diseases from Europe through central Canada to the West.

    Published November 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Medical History

  • Icelanders in North America

    The First Settlers

    Jonas Thor (Author)

    During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands of Icelanders emigrated to both North and South America. Although the best known Icelandic settlements were in southern Manitoba, in the area that became known as “New Iceland,” Icelanders also established important settlements in Brazil, Minnesota, Utah, Wisconsin, Washington, Saskatchewan, and Nova Scotia. Earlier accounts of this immigration have tended to concentrate on the history of New Iceland. Using letters, Icelandic and English periodicals and newspapers, census reports, and archival repositories, Jonas Thor expands this view by looking at Icelandic immigration from a continent-wide perspective.

    Published November 2002 | Ethnic Studies, History, Icelandic Studies

  • A Thousand Miles of Prairie

    The Manitoba Historical Society and the History of Western Canada

    Jim Blanchard (Editor)

    A Thousand Miles of Prairie is a fascinating look at Manitoba’s early boom years (1880-1910) through the eyes and words of some of the most interesting personalities of early Winnipeg. This collection brings together fourteen pieces from the first decades of the Manitoba Historical Society, when its lectures were attended by the province’s political and cultural elite.

    Published October 2002 | History

  • Preserving the Sacred

    Historical Perspectives on the Ojibwa Midewiwin

    Michael Angel (Author)

    The Midewiwin is the traditional religious belief system central to the world view of Ojibwa in Canada and the US. The rituals of the Midewiwin were observed by many 19th century Euro-Americans, most of whom approached these ceremonies with hostility and suspicion. As a result, although there were many accounts of the Midewiwin published in the 19th century, they were often riddled with misinterpretations and inaccuracies. Historian Michael Angel compares the early texts written about the Midewiwin, and identifies major, common misconceptions in these accounts.

    Published October 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies

  • Muskekowuck Athinuwick

    Original People of the Great Swampy Land

    Victor P. Lytwyn (Author)

    The original people of the Hudson Bay lowlands, often known as the Lowland Cree and known to themselves as Muskekowuck Athinuwick, were among the first Aboriginal peoples in northwestern North America to come into contact with Europeans. This book challenges long-held misconceptions about the Lowland Cree, and illustrates how historians have often misunderstood the role and resourcefulness of Aboriginal peoples during the fur-trade era.

    Published March 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies

  • Hidden Worlds

    Revisiting the Mennonite Migrants of the 1870s

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    In the 1870s, approximately 18,000 Mennonites migrated from the southern steppes of Imperial Russia (present-day Ukraine) to the North American grasslands. Their adaptation to the New World required new concepts of social boundary and community, new strategies of land ownership and legacy, new associations, and new ways of interacting with markets. In Hidden Worlds, historian Royden Loewen illuminates some of these adaptations, which have been largely overshadowed by an emphasis on institutional history, or whose sources have only recently been revealed.

    Published November 2001 | Ethnic Studies, History