Books

  • They Knew Both Sides of Medicine

    Cree Tales of Curing and Cursing Told by Alice Ahenakew / âh-âyîtaw isi ê-kî-kiskêyihtahkik maskihkiy

    H.C. Wolfart (Translator), Freda Ahenakew (Translator)

    Born in 1912, Alice Ahenakew was brought up in a traditional Cree community in north-central Saskatchewan. As a young woman, she married Andrew Ahenakew, a member of the prominent Saskatchewan family, who later became an Anglican clergyman and a prominent healer. Alice Ahenakew’s personal reminiscences include stories of her childhood, courtship and marriage, as well as an account of the 1928 influenza epidemic and encounters with a windigo. The centrepiece of this book is the fascinating account of Andrew Ahenakew’s bear vision, through which he received healing powers.

    Published November 2000 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • Laws of Early Iceland, Gragas II

    Andrew Dennis (Translator), Peter Foote (Translator), Richard Perkins (Translator)

    The laws of Mediaeval Iceland provide detailed and fascinating insight into the society that produced the Icelandic sagas. Known collectively as Gragas (Greygoose), this great legal code offers a wealth of information about early European legal systems and the society of the Middles Ages. This first translation of Gragas is in two volumes.

    Published November 2000 | University of Manitoba Icelandic Studies, Icelandic Studies

  • One Version of the Facts

    My Life in the Ivory Tower

    Henry E. Duckworth (Author)

    In his engaging memoirs, One Version of the Facts: My Life in the Ivory Tower, Dr. Henry Duckworth takes readers from his student days in Winnipeg and Chicago in the 1930s to his time as president of the University of Winnipeg (1971-1981) and chancellor of the University of Manitoba. With humour and modesty, Henry Duckworth recalls trends, changes, and crises he witnessed throughout his long university career.

    Published October 2000 | History

  • Mac Runciman

    A Life in the Grain Trade

    Paul D. Earl (Author)

    One of the most turbulent periods in the history of prairie agriculture is chronicled in this book about the life and times of Alexander “Mac” Runciman, the Saskatchewan farmer who led the United Grain Growers as president from 1961 to 1981. Mac Runciman: A Life in the Grain Trade tells the story of how Runciman rose through the ranks of the UGG to play a central role in the fierce debates over the modernization of grain handling, subsidized freight rates, and the role of The Canadian Wheat Board.

    Published October 2000 | Agriculture & Food, Business History, History

  • Night Spirits

    The Story of the Relocation of the Sayisi Dene

    Ila Bussidor (Author), Üstün Bilgen-Reinart (Author)

    For over 1500 years, the Sayisi Dene, ‘The Dene from the East’, led an independent life, following the caribou herds and having little contact with white society. In 1956, an arbitrary government decision to relocate them catapulted the Sayisi Dene into the 20th century. Inadequately housed, without jobs, unfamiliar with the language or the culture, their independence and self-determination deteriorated into a tragic cycle of discrimination, poverty, alcoholism and violent death. In Night Spirits, the survivors, including those who were children at the time of the move, as well as the few remaining elders, recount their stories. They offer a stark and brutally honest account of the near-destruction of the Sayisi Dene, and their struggle to reclaim their lives. It is a dark story, told in hope.

    Published March 2000 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies

  • Dictionary of Manitoba Biography

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Until now, there has been no comprehensive, contemporary source for information on the many Manitobans who have left their mark on history and society. The Dictionary of Manitoba Biography fills this gap, with biographical sketches of over 1700 Manitobans who have made an impact in politics, the arts, sports, commerce, agriculture, and society during their lives. It is an invaluable resource for scholars, students, and general readers interested in Canadian history.

    Published December 1999 | History

  • Manitoba Medicine

    A Brief History

    Ian Carr (Author), Robert E. Beamish (Author)

    Beginning with a description of some early Aboriginal healing practices and of the physicians of the Red River Settlement, Manitoba Medicine follows the struggles in the 1870s to establish what would become the first medical college and the first major hospitals in Western Canada. It chronicles the fight for public health in the 1920s, the development of health insurance and medicare after WWII, and medicine’s role in fighting the 1950 Winnipeg Flood and the polio epidemic of the late 1950s.

    Published November 1999 | History

  • From the Inside Out

    The Rural Worlds of Mennonite Diarists

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    Historian Royden Loewen has brought together selections from diaries kept by 21 Mennonites in Canada between 1863 and 1929, some translated from German for the first time. By skillfully comparing and contrasting a wide cross-section of lives, Loewen shows how these diaries often turn the hidden contours of household and community “inside out.”

    Published October 1999 | Ethnic Studies, History, Mennonite Studies

  • A National Crime

    The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879 to 1986

    John S. Milloy (Author)

    Using previously unreleased government documents, historian John S. Milloy provides a full picture of the history and reality of the residential school system. A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

    Published May 1999 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies

  • The Dog’s Children

    Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams

    Angeline Williams (Author), Leonard Bloomfield (Editor), John D. Nichols (Editor)

    These are a collection of 20 stories, dictated in 1941 to Bloomfield’s linguistics class, edited from manuscripts now in the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution, and published for the first time. In Ojibwe, with English translations by Bloomfield. Ojibwe-English glossary and other linguistic study aids.

    Published January 1999 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies