Books

  • Manitoba Medicine

    A Brief History

    Ian Carr (Author), Robert E. Beamish (Author)

    Beginning with a description of some early Aboriginal healing practices and of the physicians of the Red River Settlement, Manitoba Medicine follows the struggles in the 1870s to establish what would become the first medical college and the first major hospitals in Western Canada. It chronicles the fight for public health in the 1920s, the development of health insurance and medicare after WWII, and medicine’s role in fighting the 1950 Winnipeg Flood and the polio epidemic of the late 1950s.

    Published November 1999 | History

  • From the Inside Out

    The Rural Worlds of Mennonite Diarists

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    Historian Royden Loewen has brought together selections from diaries kept by 21 Mennonites in Canada between 1863 and 1929, some translated from German for the first time. By skillfully comparing and contrasting a wide cross-section of lives, Loewen shows how these diaries often turn the hidden contours of household and community “inside out.”

    Published October 1999 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • A National Crime

    The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879 to 1986

    John S. Milloy (Author)

    Using previously unreleased government documents, historian John S. Milloy provides a full picture of the history and reality of the residential school system. A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

    Published May 1999 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies

  • The Dog’s Children

    Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams

    Angeline Williams (Author), Leonard Bloomfield (Editor), John D. Nichols (Editor)

    These are a collection of 20 stories, dictated in 1941 to Bloomfield’s linguistics class, edited from manuscripts now in the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution, and published for the first time. In Ojibwe, with English translations by Bloomfield. Ojibwe-English glossary and other linguistic study aids.

    Published January 1999 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • Making it Home

    Place in Canadian Literature

    Deborah Keahey (Author)

    Redefines our understanding of place, home, and the relationship between them.

    Published December 1998 | Environmental Studies, Literary Criticism, Literature

  • The Counselling Speeches of Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw

    ana kâ-pimwêwêhahk okakêskihkêmowina

    Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw (Author), Freda Ahenakew (Editor), H.C. Wolfart (Editor)

    Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw was a respected Cree Elder from Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, who spoke only Cree and provided these original counselling discourses.

    Published October 1998 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • The Organ in Manitoba

    A History of the Instruments, the Builders, and the Players

    James B. Hartman (Author)

    Pipe organs were once a central (and sometimes hotly debated) part of Manitoba’s cultural life. The Organ in Manitoba portrays that history — the instruments, builders, players and critics — from the date of the earliest known installations to the 1990s, and includes information on musical organizations such as the Royal Canadian College of Organists.

    Published December 1997 | History

  • In Her Own Voice

    Childbirth Stories from Mennonite Women

    Katherine Martens (Author)

    Winnipeg writer Katherine Martens interviewed 26 women from the Mennonite community in southern Manitoba, ranging in age from 22 to 88 years old. In the privacy of their kitchens and parlours, over sociable cups of tea, they share with Martens their private fears and joys about what was often seen as a rite of passage into responsible adulthood, and they recalled that childbirth could be a difficult and, at times, traumatic event, but it could also be a radiant and spiritual experience.

    Published May 1997 | Ethnic Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Writings by Western Icelandic Women

    Kirsten Wolf (Translator)

    This collection of short stories and poems spans 75 years of writings. It includes translated work by little-known authors such as Undina, “a modest poet,” as well as works in English by prominent writers such as Laura Goodman Salverson, twice a winner of the Governor-General’s Award. From the hopefulness of the early immigration in the 1870s to the conflict of assimilation in the 1950s, the pieces reflect a range of experiences common to immigrant women from many cultures.

    Published January 1997 | Icelandic Studies, Women’s Studies

  • River Road

    Essays on Manitoba and Prairie History

    Gerald Friesen (Author)

    The prairies are a focal point for momentous events in Canadian history, a place where two visions of Canada have often clashed: Louis Riel, the Manitoba School Question, French language rights, the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, and the dramatic collapse of the Meech Lake Accord when MLA Elijah Harper voted “No.” In River Road, historian Gerald Friesen considers new viewpoints of the prairie past, using the perspectives of ethnic and cultural history, women’s history, regional history, and labour history to raise questions of interpretation and context. The time frame considered is equally wide-ranging, from the Aboriginal and Red River society to the political arena of current constitutional debates.

    Published December 1996 | History