Books

  • River Road

    Essays on Manitoba and Prairie History

    Gerald Friesen (Author)

    The prairies are a focal point for momentous events in Canadian history, a place where two visions of Canada have often clashed: Louis Riel, the Manitoba School Question, French language rights, the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, and the dramatic collapse of the Meech Lake Accord when MLA Elijah Harper voted “No.” In River Road, historian Gerald Friesen considers new viewpoints of the prairie past, using the perspectives of ethnic and cultural history, women’s history, regional history, and labour history to raise questions of interpretation and context. The time frame considered is equally wide-ranging, from the Aboriginal and Red River society to the political arena of current constitutional debates.

    Published December 1996 | History

  • Women of the First Nations

    Power, Wisdom, and Strength

    Christine Miller (Editor), Patricia Chuchryk (Editor)

    Women of the First Nations examines various aspects of Aboriginal women’s lives from a variety of theoretical and personal perspectives. The authors discuss standard media representations, as well as historical and current realities. They bring new perspectives to discussions on Aboriginal art, literature, historical, and cultural contributions, and they offer diverse viewpoints on present economic, environmental, and political issues. This collection counters the marginalization and silencing of First Nations women’s voices and reflects the power, strength, and wisdom inherent in their lives.

    Published August 1996 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • The Geography of Manitoba

    Its Land and its People

    John Welsted (Editor), John Everitt (Editor), Christoph Stadel (Editor)

    Manitoba is more than one of Canada’s three prairie provinces. Encompassing 649,950 square kilometres, its territory ranges from Canadian Shield to grassland, parkland, and subarctic tundra. Geography of Manitoba is the first comprehensive guide to all aspects of the human and physical geography of this unique province. Representing the work of 47 scholars, and illustrated with over 200 maps, diagrams, and photographs, it is divided into four main sections, covering the major areas of the province’s geography: Physical Background; People and Settlements; Resources and Industry; and Recreation.

    Published March 1996

  • Cree Legends and Narratives from the West Coast of James Bay

    âtalôhkâna nêsta tipâcimôwina

    C. Douglas Ellis (Editor)

    This is the first major body of annotated texts in James Bay Cree, and a unique documentation of Swampy and Moose Cree (Western James Bay) usage of the 1950s and 1960s. Conversations and interviews with 16 different speakers include: legends, reminiscences, historical narratives, stories and conversations, as well as descriptions of technology.

    Published July 1995 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • O Little Town

    Remembering Life in a Prairie Village

    Harlo L. Jones (Author)

    Harlo Jones describes his childhood and adolescence from the late 1920s to the early 1940s in Dinsmore, Saskatchewan, sixty-five miles from Saskatoon.

    Published January 1995

  • Severing the Ties that Bind

    Government Repression of Indigenous Religious Ceremonies on the Prairies

    Katherine Pettipas (Author)

    Religious ceremonies were an inseparable part of Aboriginal traditional life, reinforcing social, economic, and political values. However, missionaries and government officials with ethnocentric attitudes of cultural superiority decreed that Native dances and ceremonies were immoral or un-Christian and an impediment to the integration of the Native population into Canadian society. Katherine Pettipas presents a critical analysis of the administrative policies and considers the effects of government suppression of traditional religious activities on the whole spectrum of Aboriginal life, focussing on the experiences of the Plains Cree from the mid-1880s to 1951, when the regulations pertaining to religious practices were removed from the Indian Act.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies

  • The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870

    Laura Peers (Author)

    Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies

  • The Cree Language Is Our Identity

    The LA Ronge Lectures of Sarah Whitecalf/kinêhiyâwiwininaw nêhiyawêwin

    H.C. Wolfart (Author), Freda Ahenakew (Author), (Author)

    Publication of the Algonquian Text Society #3.

    Published November 1993 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society

  • As Long as the Rivers Run

    Hydroelectric Development and Native Communities

    James B. Waldram (Author)

    Waldram examines the politics of hydroelectric dam construction in the Canadian northwest, focussing on the negotiations and agreements between the developers and the Native residents. He shows the parallels between the treatment of Natives by the government of Canada in these negotiations and the treaty process a century earlier.

    Published October 1993 | Indigenous Studies

  • Wild Mother Dancing

    Maternal Narrative in Canadian Literature

    Di Brandt (Author)

    Wild Mother Dancing challenges the historical absence of the mother, who, as subject and character, has been repeatedly suppressed and edited out of the literary canon. In her search for sources for telling the new (or old, forbidden story) against a tradition of narrative absence, Brandt turns to Canadian fiction representing a varety of cultural traditions — Margaret Laurence, Daphne Marlatt, Jovette Marchessault, Joy Kogawa, Sky Lee — and a collection of oral interviews about childbirth told by Mennonite women.

    Published September 1993 | Literary Criticism