Books

  • Making it Home

    Place in Canadian Literature

    Deborah Keahey (Author)

    Redefines our understanding of place, home, and the relationship between them.

    Published December 1998 | Environmental Studies, Literary Criticism, Literature

  • The Counselling Speeches of Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw

    ana kâ-pimwêwêhahk okakêskihkêmowina

    Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw (Author), Freda Ahenakew (Editor), H.C. Wolfart (Editor)

    Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw was a respected Cree Elder from Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, who spoke only Cree and provided these original counselling discourses.

    Published October 1998 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • The Organ in Manitoba

    A History of the Instruments, the Builders, and the Players

    James B. Hartman (Author)

    Pipe organs were once a central (and sometimes hotly debated) part of Manitoba’s cultural life. The Organ in Manitoba portrays that history — the instruments, builders, players and critics — from the date of the earliest known installations to the 1990s, and includes information on musical organizations such as the Royal Canadian College of Organists.

    Published December 1997 | History

  • In Her Own Voice

    Childbirth Stories from Mennonite Women

    Katherine Martens (Author)

    Winnipeg writer Katherine Martens interviewed 26 women from the Mennonite community in southern Manitoba, ranging in age from 22 to 88 years old. In the privacy of their kitchens and parlours, over sociable cups of tea, they share with Martens their private fears and joys about what was often seen as a rite of passage into responsible adulthood, and they recalled that childbirth could be a difficult and, at times, traumatic event, but it could also be a radiant and spiritual experience.

    Published May 1997 | Ethnic Studies, Mennonite Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Writings by Western Icelandic Women

    Kirsten Wolf (Translator)

    This collection of short stories and poems spans 75 years of writings. It includes translated work by little-known authors such as Undina, “a modest poet,” as well as works in English by prominent writers such as Laura Goodman Salverson, twice a winner of the Governor-General’s Award. From the hopefulness of the early immigration in the 1870s to the conflict of assimilation in the 1950s, the pieces reflect a range of experiences common to immigrant women from many cultures.

    Published January 1997 | Icelandic Studies, Women’s Studies

  • River Road

    Essays on Manitoba and Prairie History

    Gerald Friesen (Author)

    The prairies are a focal point for momentous events in Canadian history, a place where two visions of Canada have often clashed: Louis Riel, the Manitoba School Question, French language rights, the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, and the dramatic collapse of the Meech Lake Accord when MLA Elijah Harper voted “No.” In River Road, historian Gerald Friesen considers new viewpoints of the prairie past, using the perspectives of ethnic and cultural history, women’s history, regional history, and labour history to raise questions of interpretation and context. The time frame considered is equally wide-ranging, from the Aboriginal and Red River society to the political arena of current constitutional debates.

    Published December 1996 | History

  • Women of the First Nations

    Power, Wisdom, and Strength

    Christine Miller (Editor), Patricia Chuchryk (Editor)

    Women of the First Nations examines various aspects of Aboriginal women’s lives from a variety of theoretical and personal perspectives. The authors discuss standard media representations, as well as historical and current realities. They bring new perspectives to discussions on Aboriginal art, literature, historical, and cultural contributions, and they offer diverse viewpoints on present economic, environmental, and political issues. This collection counters the marginalization and silencing of First Nations women’s voices and reflects the power, strength, and wisdom inherent in their lives.

    Published August 1996 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • The Geography of Manitoba

    Its Land and its People

    John Welsted (Editor), John Everitt (Editor), Christoph Stadel (Editor)

    Manitoba is more than one of Canada’s three prairie provinces. Encompassing 649,950 square kilometres, its territory ranges from Canadian Shield to grassland, parkland, and subarctic tundra. Geography of Manitoba is the first comprehensive guide to all aspects of the human and physical geography of this unique province. Representing the work of 47 scholars, and illustrated with over 200 maps, diagrams, and photographs, it is divided into four main sections, covering the major areas of the province’s geography: Physical Background; People and Settlements; Resources and Industry; and Recreation.

    Published March 1996

  • Cree Legends and Narratives from the West Coast of James Bay

    âtalôhkâna nêsta tipâcimôwina

    C. Douglas Ellis (Editor)

    This is the first major body of annotated texts in James Bay Cree, and a unique documentation of Swampy and Moose Cree (Western James Bay) usage of the 1950s and 1960s. Conversations and interviews with 16 different speakers include: legends, reminiscences, historical narratives, stories and conversations, as well as descriptions of technology.

    Published July 1995 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies

  • O Little Town

    Remembering Life in a Prairie Village

    Harlo L. Jones (Author)

    Harlo Jones describes his childhood and adolescence from the late 1920s to the early 1940s in Dinsmore, Saskatchewan, sixty-five miles from Saskatoon.

    Published January 1995