Books – Colonialism

  • River Road

    Essays on Manitoba and Prairie History

    Gerald Friesen (Author)

    The prairies are a focal point for momentous events in Canadian history, a place where two visions of Canada have often clashed: Louis Riel, the Manitoba School Question, French language rights, the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, and the dramatic collapse of the Meech Lake Accord when MLA Elijah Harper voted “No.” In River Road, historian Gerald Friesen considers new viewpoints of the prairie past, using the perspectives of ethnic and cultural history, women’s history, regional history, and labour history to raise questions of interpretation and context. The time frame considered is equally wide-ranging, from the Aboriginal and Red River society to the political arena of current constitutional debates.

    Published December 1996 | Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies, Labour Studies, Métis Studies, Social History

  • Severing the Ties that Bind

    Government Repression of Indigenous Religious Ceremonies on the Prairies

    Katherine Pettipas (Author)

    Religious ceremonies were an inseparable part of Aboriginal traditional life, reinforcing social, economic, and political values. However, missionaries and government officials with ethnocentric attitudes of cultural superiority decreed that Native dances and ceremonies were immoral or un-Christian and an impediment to the integration of the Native population into Canadian society. Katherine Pettipas presents a critical analysis of the administrative policies and considers the effects of government suppression of traditional religious activities on the whole spectrum of Aboriginal life, focussing on the experiences of the Plains Cree from the mid-1880s to 1951, when the regulations pertaining to religious practices were removed from the Indian Act.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies, Religion

  • The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870

    Laura Peers (Author)

    Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence

  • As Long as the Rivers Run

    Hydroelectric Development and Native Communities

    James B. Waldram (Author)

    Waldram examines the politics of hydroelectric dam construction in the Canadian northwest, focussing on the negotiations and agreements between the developers and the Native residents. He shows the parallels between the treatment of Natives by the government of Canada in these negotiations and the treaty process a century earlier.

    Published October 1993 | Colonialism, Environmental Studies, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence, Resource Management

  • The Plains Cree

    Trade, Diplomacy, and War, 1790 to 1870

    John S. Milloy (Author)

    The first economic, military, and diplomatic history of the Plains Cree from contact with the Europeans in the 1670s to the disappearance of the buffalo from Cree lands by the 1870s, focussing on military and trade relations between 1790 and 1870.

    Published May 1990 | Critical Studies in Native History, Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies, Military History

  • Indian-European Trade Relations

    in the Lower Saskatchewan River Region to 1840

    Paul C. Thistle (Author)

    This study examines the development of fur trade relations between the European traders working for the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Western Woods Cree of the lower Saskatchewan River region centred on Cumberland House (modern day Saskatchewan) and The Pas (modern day Manitoba).

    Published February 1986 | Critical Studies in Native History, Business History, Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies

  • The New Peoples

    Being and Becoming Métis

    Jacqueline Peterson (Editor), Jennifer S.H. Brown (Editor)

    A path-breaking collection of original essays by twelve leading Canadian and American scholars, this volume is the first major work to explore, in a North American context, the dimension and meaning of the process fundamental to the European invasion and colonization of the western hemisphere: the intermingling of European and native American peoples.

    Published October 1985 | Critical Studies in Native History, Colonialism, History, Indigenous Studies, Métis Studies

  • The People’s Clearance

    Highland Emigration to British North America, 1770-1815

    (Author)

    A revisionist account of Highland Scottish emigration to what is now Canada, in the formative half century before Waterloo.

    Currently out of print.

    Published January 1982 | Colonialism, Ethnic Studies, History, Immigration