Books – Ethnic Studies

  • Mennonite Women in Canada

    A History

    Marlene Epp (Author)

    Mennonite Women in Canada traces the complex social history and multiple identities of Canadian Mennonite women over 200 years. Marlene Epp explores women’s roles, as prescribed and as lived, within the contexts of immigration and settlement, household and family, church and organizational life, work and education, and in response to social trends and events.

    Published October 2008 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History, Women’s Studies

  • Imagined Homes

    Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities

    Hans Werner (Author)

    Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities is a study of the social and cultural integration of two migrations of German speakers from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to Winnipeg, Canada in the late 1940s, and Bielefeld, Germany in the 1970s. Employing a cross-national comparative framework, Hans Werner reveals that the imagined trajectory of immigrant lives influenced the process of integration into a new urban environment.

    Published November 2007 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History

  • Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood

    Europe - Russia - Canada, 1525 to 1980

    James Urry (Author)

    Mennonites and their forebears are usually thought to be a people with little interest or involvement in politics. Mennonites, Politics, and Peoplehood reveals that since their early history, Mennonites have, in fact, been active participants in worldly politics.

    Published February 2006 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • Providence Watching

    Journeys from Wartorn Poland to the Canadian Prairies

    Kazimierz Patalas (Editor), Zbigniew Izydorczyk (Translator)

    At the start of the Second World War, Poland was invaded by both the German and the Soviet armies. After the war, Canada accepted over 4000 Polish immigrant soldiers and their families who did not want to return to a communist regime in their country. This book is a moving oral history of the experiences of forty-five individuals during that transition period between the outbreak of war and their eventual relocation in Canada.

    Published December 2003 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • Icelanders in North America

    The First Settlers

    Jonas Thor (Author)

    During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands of Icelanders emigrated to both North and South America. Although the best known Icelandic settlements were in southern Manitoba, in the area that became known as “New Iceland,” Icelanders also established important settlements in Brazil, Minnesota, Utah, Wisconsin, Washington, Saskatchewan, and Nova Scotia. Earlier accounts of this immigration have tended to concentrate on the history of New Iceland. Using letters, Icelandic and English periodicals and newspapers, census reports, and archival repositories, Jonas Thor expands this view by looking at Icelandic immigration from a continent-wide perspective.

    Published November 2002 | Ethnic Studies, History, Icelandic Studies

  • Hidden Worlds

    Revisiting the Mennonite Migrants of the 1870s

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    In the 1870s, approximately 18,000 Mennonites migrated from the southern steppes of Imperial Russia (present-day Ukraine) to the North American grasslands. Their adaptation to the New World required new concepts of social boundary and community, new strategies of land ownership and legacy, new associations, and new ways of interacting with markets. In Hidden Worlds, historian Royden Loewen illuminates some of these adaptations, which have been largely overshadowed by an emphasis on institutional history, or whose sources have only recently been revealed.

    Published November 2001 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • From the Inside Out

    The Rural Worlds of Mennonite Diarists

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    Historian Royden Loewen has brought together selections from diaries kept by 21 Mennonites in Canada between 1863 and 1929, some translated from German for the first time. By skillfully comparing and contrasting a wide cross-section of lives, Loewen shows how these diaries often turn the hidden contours of household and community “inside out.”

    Published October 1999 | Ethnic Studies, History

  • In Her Own Voice

    Childbirth Stories from Mennonite Women

    Katherine Martens (Author)

    Winnipeg writer Katherine Martens interviewed 26 women from the Mennonite community in southern Manitoba, ranging in age from 22 to 88 years old. In the privacy of their kitchens and parlours, over sociable cups of tea, they share with Martens their private fears and joys about what was often seen as a rite of passage into responsible adulthood, and they recalled that childbirth could be a difficult and, at times, traumatic event, but it could also be a radiant and spiritual experience.

    Published May 1997 | Ethnic Studies, Women’s Studies