Books

  • Severing the Ties that Bind

    Government Repression of Indigenous Religious Ceremonies on the Prairies

    Katherine Pettipas (Author)

    Religious ceremonies were an inseparable part of Aboriginal traditional life, reinforcing social, economic, and political values. However, missionaries and government officials with ethnocentric attitudes of cultural superiority decreed that Native dances and ceremonies were immoral or un-Christian and an impediment to the integration of the Native population into Canadian society. Katherine Pettipas presents a critical analysis of the administrative policies and considers the effects of government suppression of traditional religious activities on the whole spectrum of Aboriginal life, focussing on the experiences of the Plains Cree from the mid-1880s to 1951, when the regulations pertaining to religious practices were removed from the Indian Act.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, Decolonization, History, Indigenous Studies, Religion

  • The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870

    Laura Peers (Author)

    Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence

  • The Cree Language Is Our Identity

    The LA Ronge Lectures of Sarah Whitecalf/kinêhiyâwiwininaw nêhiyawêwin

    H.C. Wolfart (Author), Freda Ahenakew (Author)

    Publication of the Algonquian Text Society #3.

    Published November 1993 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies, Linguistics, Translation

  • As Long as the Rivers Run

    Hydroelectric Development and Native Communities

    James B. Waldram (Author)

    Waldram examines the politics of hydroelectric dam construction in the Canadian northwest, focussing on the negotiations and agreements between the developers and the Native residents. He shows the parallels between the treatment of Natives by the government of Canada in these negotiations and the treaty process a century earlier.

    Published October 1993 | Decolonization, Environmental Studies, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence, Resource Management

  • Wild Mother Dancing

    Maternal Narrative in Canadian Literature

    Di Brandt (Author)

    Wild Mother Dancing challenges the historical absence of the mother, who, as subject and character, has been repeatedly suppressed and edited out of the literary canon. In her search for sources for telling the new (or old, forbidden story) against a tradition of narrative absence, Brandt turns to Canadian fiction representing a varety of cultural traditions — Margaret Laurence, Daphne Marlatt, Jovette Marchessault, Joy Kogawa, Sky Lee — and a collection of oral interviews about childbirth told by Mennonite women.

    Published September 1993 | Gender Studies, Literary Criticism, Mennonite Studies, Oral History & Storytelling, Women’s Studies

  • Western Icelandic Short Stories

    Kirsten Wolf (Translator), Arny Hjaltadottir (Translator)

    This selection of Western Icelandic writings, the first of its kind in English, represents a wide collection of first and second generation Icelandic-Canadian authors. The stories, first published between 1895 and 1930, are set mainly in North America (especially Manitoba). They reflect a weath of literary activity, from the numerous Western Icelandic newspapers and journals, to the reading circles and cultural and literary societies that supported them.

    Published December 1992 | Ethnic Studies, Icelandic Studies, Literature, Social History, Translation

  • The Iron Rose

    The Extraordinary Life of Charlotte Ross, MD

    (Author)

    Charlotte Ross (1843-1916) belonged to the first generation of women to practice medicine in Canada and was Manitoba’s first qualified woman doctor.

    Published January 1992 | Gender Studies, History, Medical History, Women’s Studies

  • Tell the Driver

    A Biography of Elinor F.E. Black, MD

    Julie Vandervoort (Author)

    A biography of Dr. Elinor Black (1905-1982), the first Canadian woman to gain membership in the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in London.

    Published January 1992 | Biography, Gender Studies, History, Medical History, Women’s Studies

  • Aboriginal Resource Use in Canada

    Historical and Legal Aspects

    Kerry Abel (Editor), Jean Friesen (Editor)

    Addresses a wide range of topics related to Aboriginal resource use, ranging from the pre-contact period to the present.

    Published January 1991 | Critical Studies in Native History, Environmental Studies, History, Indigenous Studies, Law

  • Living the Changes

    Joan Turner (Editor)

    Explores the nature and extent of women’s changing realities.

    Published December 1990 | Gender Studies, Women’s Studies