Books – History

  • Winnipeg Beach

    Leisure and Courtship in a Resort Town, 1900-1967

    Dale Barbour (Author)

    During the first half of the twentieth century, Winnipeg Beach proudly marketed itself as the Coney Island of the West. Located just north of Manitoba’s bustling capital, it drew 40,000 visitors a day and served as an important intersection point between classes, ethnic communities, and perhaps most importantly, between genders. In Winnipeg Beach, Dale Barbour takes us into the heart of this turn of the century resort area and introduces us to some of the people who worked, played and lived in the resort.

    Published February 2011 | History

  • Storied Landscapes

    Ethno-Religious Identity and the Canadian Prairies

    Frances Swyripa (Author)

    Storied Landscapes is a beautifully written, sweeping examination of the evolving identity of major ethno-religious immigrant groups in the Canadian West. Viewed through the lens of attachment to the soil and specific place, and through the eyes of both the immigrant generation and its descendants, the book compares the settlement experiences of Ukrainians, Mennonites, Icelanders, Doukhobors, Germans, Poles, Romanians, Jews, Finns, Swedes, Norwegians, and Danes.

    Published October 2010 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History

  • Winnipeg’s Great War

    A City Comes of Age

    Jim Blanchard (Author)

    Winnipeg’s Great War picks up in 1914, just as the city is regrouping after a brief economic downturn. War comes unexpectedly, thoughts of recovery are abandoned, and the city digs in for a hard-fought four years. Using letters, diaries, and newspaper reports, Jim Blanchard brings us into the homes and public offices of Winnipeg and its citizens to illustrate the profound effect the war had on every aspect of the city, from its politics and economy, to its men on the battlefield and its war-weary families fighting on the homefront.

    Published September 2010 | History, Military History

  • Families, Lovers, and their Letters

    Italian Postwar Migration to Canada

    Sonia Cancian (Author)

    Families, Lovers, and their Letters takes us into the passionate hearts and minds of ordinary people caught in the heartbreak of transatlantic migration. It examines the experiences of Italian migrants to Canada and their loved ones left behind in Italy following the Second World War, when the largest migration of Italians to Canada took place.

    Published May 2010 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History

  • Sounds of Ethnicity

    Listening to German North America, 1850 - 1914

    Barbara Lorenzkowski (Author)

    Sounds of Ethnicity takes us into the linguistic, cultural, and geographical borderlands of German North America in the Great Lakes region between 1850 and 1914. Drawing connections between immigrant groups in Buffalo, New York, and Berlin (now Kitchener), Ontario, Barbara Lorenzkowski examines the interactions of language and music — specifically German-language education, choral groups, and music festivals—and their roles in creating both an ethnic sense of self and opportunities for cultural exchanges at the local, ethnic, and transnational levels.

    Published May 2010 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, History

  • Prairie Metropolis

    New Essays on Winnipeg Social History

    Esyllt W. Jones (Editor), Gerald Friesen (Editor)

    Prairie Metropolis brings together some of the best new graduate research on the history of Winnipeg and makes a groundbreaking contribution to the history of the city between 1900 and the 1980s. The essays in this collection explore the development of social institutions such as the city’s police force, juvenile court, health care institutions, volunteer organizations, and cultural centres.

    Published September 2009 | History

  • Lord Selkirk

    A Life

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Thomas Douglas, the Fifth Earl of Selkirk (1770–1820), was a complex man of his times, whose passions left an indelible mark on Canadian history. The product of three decades of research, this is the definitive biography of Lord Selkirk. Bumsted’s passionate prose and thoughtful analysis illuminate not only the man, but also the political and economic realities of the British empire at the turn of the nineteenth century.

    Published November 2008 | History

  • For All We Have and Are

    Regina and the Experience of the Great War

    James M. Pitsula (Author)

    The First World War profoundly affected every community in Canada. In Regina, the politics of national identity, the rural myth, and the social gospel all lent a distinctive flavour to the city’s experience of the Great War. Skillfully combining vivid detail with the larger social context, For All We Have and Are provides a nuanced picture of how one Canadian community rebuilt both its realities and myths in response to the cataclysm of the “war to end all wars.”

    Published November 2008 | History, Military History

  • Perspectives of Saskatchewan

    Jene M. Porter (Editor)

    In Perspectives of Saskatchewan, twenty-one noted scholars present an in-depth look at some of the major developments in the province’s history, including subjects such as art, literature, demographics, politics, northern development, and religion.

    Published November 2008 | History

  • Mennonite Women in Canada

    A History

    Marlene Epp (Author)

    Mennonite Women in Canada traces the complex social history and multiple identities of Canadian Mennonite women over 200 years. Marlene Epp explores women’s roles, as prescribed and as lived, within the contexts of immigration and settlement, household and family, church and organizational life, work and education, and in response to social trends and events.

    Published October 2008 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History, Mennonite Studies, Women’s Studies