Books – History

  • The University of Manitoba

    An Illustrated History

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Established in 1877, just seven years after the founding of the province itself, the University of Manitoba has grown to become an international centre of research and study. It is the birthplace of discoveries such as the cure for Rh disease of newborns and the development of Canola, and its alumni include Marshal McLuhan, Margaret Laurence, Monty Hall, Israel Asper and Ovide Mercredi. Historian J.M. Bumsted looks at how the university was forged out of the assembly of several, small, denominational colleges, and how it survived and even thrived during challenges such as the 1932 defalcation and the 1950 Manitoba flood.

    Published November 2001 | History

  • Toward Defining the Prairies

    Region, Culture, and History

    Robert Wardhaugh (Editor)

    New ways of thinking about literature and history have radically changed how we think about or even “define” a region like the Prairie West. Toward Defining the Prairies highlights recent approaches to thinking about the Prairie West. Bounded by pieces from well-known historian Gerald Friesen and Governor-General’s Award-winning writer Robert Kroetsch, these 13 essays are as diverse as the region itself.

    Published April 2001 | History

  • Thomas Scott’s Body

    And Other Essays on Early Manitoba History

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    What did happen to the body of Thomas Scott? The disposal of the body of Canadian history’s most famous political victim is the starting point for historian J.M. Bumsted’s new look at some of the most fascinating events and personalities of Manitoba’s Red River Settlement. By looking at well-known figures from a new perspective, and by examining some of the more obscure corners of the settlement’s history, Bumsted challenges many of the widely held assumptions about Red River.

    Published November 2000 | History

  • One Version of the Facts

    My Life in the Ivory Tower

    Henry E. Duckworth (Author)

    In his engaging memoirs, One Version of the Facts: My Life in the Ivory Tower, Dr. Henry Duckworth takes readers from his student days in Winnipeg and Chicago in the 1930s to his time as president of the University of Winnipeg (1971-1981) and chancellor of the University of Manitoba. With humour and modesty, Henry Duckworth recalls trends, changes, and crises he witnessed throughout his long university career.

    Published October 2000 | History

  • Mac Runciman

    A Life in the Grain Trade

    Paul D. Earl (Author)

    One of the most turbulent periods in the history of prairie agriculture is chronicled in this book about the life and times of Alexander “Mac” Runciman, the Saskatchewan farmer who led the United Grain Growers as president from 1961 to 1981. Mac Runciman: A Life in the Grain Trade tells the story of how Runciman rose through the ranks of the UGG to play a central role in the fierce debates over the modernization of grain handling, subsidized freight rates, and the role of The Canadian Wheat Board.

    Published October 2000 | Agriculture & Food, Business History, History

  • Dictionary of Manitoba Biography

    J.M. Bumsted (Author)

    Until now, there has been no comprehensive, contemporary source for information on the many Manitobans who have left their mark on history and society. The Dictionary of Manitoba Biography fills this gap, with biographical sketches of over 1700 Manitobans who have made an impact in politics, the arts, sports, commerce, agriculture, and society during their lives. It is an invaluable resource for scholars, students, and general readers interested in Canadian history.

    Published December 1999 | History

  • Manitoba Medicine

    A Brief History

    Ian Carr (Author), Robert E. Beamish (Author)

    Beginning with a description of some early Aboriginal healing practices and of the physicians of the Red River Settlement, Manitoba Medicine follows the struggles in the 1870s to establish what would become the first medical college and the first major hospitals in Western Canada. It chronicles the fight for public health in the 1920s, the development of health insurance and medicare after WWII, and medicine’s role in fighting the 1950 Winnipeg Flood and the polio epidemic of the late 1950s.

    Published November 1999 | History

  • From the Inside Out

    The Rural Worlds of Mennonite Diarists

    Royden Loewen (Author)

    Historian Royden Loewen has brought together selections from diaries kept by 21 Mennonites in Canada between 1863 and 1929, some translated from German for the first time. By skillfully comparing and contrasting a wide cross-section of lives, Loewen shows how these diaries often turn the hidden contours of household and community “inside out.”

    Published October 1999 | Ethnic Studies, History, Mennonite Studies

  • A National Crime

    The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879 to 1986

    John S. Milloy (Author)

    Using previously unreleased government documents, historian John S. Milloy provides a full picture of the history and reality of the residential school system. A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

    Published May 1999 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies

  • The Organ in Manitoba

    A History of the Instruments, the Builders, and the Players

    James B. Hartman (Author)

    Pipe organs were once a central (and sometimes hotly debated) part of Manitoba’s cultural life. The Organ in Manitoba portrays that history — the instruments, builders, players and critics — from the date of the earliest known installations to the 1990s, and includes information on musical organizations such as the Royal Canadian College of Organists.

    Published December 1997 | History