Books – Indigenous Studies

  • Seeing Red

    A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

    Mark Cronlund Anderson (Author), Carmen L. Robertson (Author)

    The first book to examine the role of Canada’s newspapers in perpetuating the myth of Native inferiority.

    Published September 2011 | Film & Media Studies, History, Indigenous Studies

  • Life Stages and Native Women

    Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine

    Kim Anderson (Author)

    A rare and inspiring guide to the health and well-being of Aboriginal women and their communities.

    Published September 2011 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • First Nations Gaming in Canada

    Yale D. Belanger (Editor)

    While games of chance have been part of the Aboriginal cultural landscape since before European contact, large-scale commercial gaming facilities within First Nations communities are a relatively new phenomenon in Canada. First Nations Gaming in Canada is the first multidisciplinary study of the role of gaming in indigenous communities north of the 49th parallel.

    Published February 2011 | Gambling, Indigenous Studies

  • Indigenous Screen Cultures in Canada

    Sigurjón Baldur Hafsteinsson (Editor), Marian Bredin (Editor)

    Who has the power to narrate and the power to suppress indigenous narratives? Are indigenous media representations themselves appropriate? What is the role of indigenous media in striking a balance between external interests and local constituencies? Indigenous Screen Cultures in Canada explores these key questions and undertakes a critical examination of the history and role of indigenous media organizations, content, and audiences in Canada and their growing importance in domestic and global movements for information democracy.

    Published October 2010 | Film & Media Studies, Indigenous Studies

  • When the Other Is Me

    Native Resistance Discourse, 1850 - 1990

    Emma LaRocque (Author)

    In this long-awaited book from one of the most recognized and respected scholars in Native Studies today, Emma LaRocque presents a powerful interdisciplinary study of the Native literary response to racist writing in the Canadian historical and literary record from 1850 to 1990.

    Published March 2010 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • Taking Back Our Spirits

    Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing

    Jo-Ann Episkenew (Author)

    From the earliest settler policies to deal with the “Indian problem,” to contemporary government-run programs ostensibly designed to help Indigenous people, public policy has played a major role in creating the historical trauma that so greatly impacts the lives of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. Taking Back Our Spirits traces the link between Canadian public policies, the injuries they have inflicted on Indigenous people, and Indigenous literature’s ability to heal individuals and communities.

    Published May 2009 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • Power Struggles

    Hydroelectric Development and First Nations in Manitoba and Quebec

    Thibault Martin (Editor), Steven M. Hoffman (Editor)

    Power Struggles: Hydro Development and First Nations in Manitoba and Quebec examines the evolution of new agreements between First Nations and Inuit and the hydro corporations in Quebec and Manitoba, including the Wuskwatim Dam Project, Paix des Braves, and the Great Whale Project.

    Published March 2009 | Indigenous Studies

  • Restoring the Balance

    First Nations Women, Community, and Culture

    Eric Guimond (Editor), Gail Guthrie Valaskakis (Editor), Madeline Dion Stout (Editor)

    Restoring the Balance brings to light the work First Nations women have performed, and continue to perform, in cultural continuity and community development. It illustrates the challenges and successes they have had in the areas of law, politics, education, community healing, language, and art, while suggesting significant options for sustained improvement of individual, family, and community well-being.

    Published November 2008 | Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Magic Weapons

    Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School

    Sam McKegney (Author)

    Magic Weapons is the first major survey of Indigenous writings on the residential school system, and provides groundbreaking readings of life writings by Rita Joe (Mi’kmaq) and Anthony Apakark Thrasher (Inuit) as well as in-depth critical studies of better known life writings by Basil Johnston (Ojibway) and Tomson Highway (Cree).

    Published November 2007 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • The New Buffalo

    The Struggle for Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada

    Blair Stonechild (Author)

    Post-secondary education, often referred to as “the new buffalo,” is a contentious but critically important issue for First Nations and the future of Canadian society. In The New Buffalo, Blair Stonechild traces the history of Aboriginal post-secondary education policy from its earliest beginnings as a government tool for assimilation and cultural suppression to its development as means of Aboriginal self-determination and self-government.

    Published October 2006 | Education, Indigenous Studies