Books – Indigenous Studies

  • Taking Back Our Spirits

    Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing

    Jo-Ann Episkenew (Author)

    From the earliest settler policies to deal with the “Indian problem,” to contemporary government-run programs ostensibly designed to help Indigenous people, public policy has played a major role in creating the historical trauma that so greatly impacts the lives of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. Taking Back Our Spirits traces the link between Canadian public policies, the injuries they have inflicted on Indigenous people, and Indigenous literature’s ability to heal individuals and communities.

    Published May 2009 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • Power Struggles

    Hydroelectric Development and First Nations in Manitoba and Quebec

    Thibault Martin (Editor), Steven M. Hoffman (Editor)

    Power Struggles: Hydro Development and First Nations in Manitoba and Quebec examines the evolution of new agreements between First Nations and Inuit and the hydro corporations in Quebec and Manitoba, including the Wuskwatim Dam Project, Paix des Braves, and the Great Whale Project.

    Published March 2009 | Indigenous Studies

  • Restoring the Balance

    First Nations Women, Community, and Culture

    Eric Guimond (Editor), Gail Guthrie Valaskakis (Editor), Madeline Dion Stout (Editor)

    Restoring the Balance brings to light the work First Nations women have performed, and continue to perform, in cultural continuity and community development. It illustrates the challenges and successes they have had in the areas of law, politics, education, community healing, language, and art, while suggesting significant options for sustained improvement of individual, family, and community well-being.

    Published November 2008 | Indigenous Studies, Open access, Women’s Studies

  • Magic Weapons

    Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School

    Sam McKegney (Author)

    Magic Weapons is the first major survey of Indigenous writings on the residential school system, and provides groundbreaking readings of life writings by Rita Joe (Mi’kmaq) and Anthony Apakark Thrasher (Inuit) as well as in-depth critical studies of better known life writings by Basil Johnston (Ojibway) and Tomson Highway (Cree).

    Published November 2007 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • The New Buffalo

    The Struggle for Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada

    Blair Stonechild (Author)

    Post-secondary education, often referred to as “the new buffalo,” is a contentious but critically important issue for First Nations and the future of Canadian society. In The New Buffalo, Blair Stonechild traces the history of Aboriginal post-secondary education policy from its earliest beginnings as a government tool for assimilation and cultural suppression to its development as means of Aboriginal self-determination and self-government.

    Published October 2006 | Education, Indigenous Studies

  • Like the Sound of a Drum

    Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut

    Peter Kulchyski (Author)

    In Like the Sound of a Drum, Peter Kulchyski brings new primary research and contemporary political theory to the study of Aboriginal politics in Denendeh and Nunavut. He looks as three northern communities — Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut — and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence.

    Published October 2005 | Contemporary Studies on the North, Indigenous Studies, Political Studies

  • Arapaho Historical Traditions

    Hinono’einoo3itoono

    Paul Moss (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator), Alonzo Moss Sr. (Translator)

    Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), a highly respected storyteller and ceremonial leader, these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. As works of an oral tradition, they had until now remained beyond the reach of those who do not speak the Arapaho language.

    Published August 2005 | Publications of the Algonquian Text Society, Indigenous Studies, Linguistics

  • Travelling Knowledges

    Positioning the Im/Migrant Reader of Aboriginal Literatures in Canada

    Renate Eigenbrod (Author)

    In the context of de/colonization, the boundary between an Aboriginal text and the analysis by a non-Aboriginal outsider poses particular challenges often constructed as unbridgeable. Eigenbrod argues that politically correct silence is not the answer but instead does a disservice to the literature that, like all literature, depends on being read, taught, and disseminated in various ways. In Travelling Knowledges, Eigenbrod suggests decolonizing strategies when approaching Aboriginal texts as an outsider and challenges conventional notions of expertise.

    Published May 2005 | Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism

  • A Very Remarkable Sickness

    Epidemics in the Petit Nord, 1670 to 1846

    Paul Hackett (Author)

    Although new diseases had first arrived in the New World in the 16th century, by the end of the 17th century shorter transoceanic travel time meant that a far greater number of diseases survived the journey from Europe and were still able to infect new communities. These acute, directly transmitted infectious diseases – including smallpox, influenza, and measles — would be responsible for a monumental loss of life and would forever transform North American Aboriginal communities. Historical geographer Paul Hackett meticulously traces the diffusion of these diseases from Europe through central Canada to the West.

    Published November 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Medical History

  • Preserving the Sacred

    Historical Perspectives on the Ojibwa Midewiwin

    Michael Angel (Author)

    The Midewiwin is the traditional religious belief system central to the world view of Ojibwa in Canada and the US. The rituals of the Midewiwin were observed by many 19th century Euro-Americans, most of whom approached these ceremonies with hostility and suspicion. As a result, although there were many accounts of the Midewiwin published in the 19th century, they were often riddled with misinterpretations and inaccuracies. Historian Michael Angel compares the early texts written about the Midewiwin, and identifies major, common misconceptions in these accounts.

    Published October 2002 | Critical Studies in Native History, Indigenous Studies