Books – Letters & Correspondence

  • No Man’s Land

    The Life and Art of Mary Riter Hamilton

    Kathryn A. Young (Author), Sarah M. McKinnon (Author)

    A life embracing new opportunities for women at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Published October 2017 | Art & Architecture, Biography, Gender Studies, Letters & Correspondence, Social History, Women’s Studies

  • Pauline Boutal

    An Artist’s Destiny, 1894-1992

    Louise Duguay (Author)

    A rich artistic talent beautifully presented in this full-colour study.

    Published October 2015 | Art & Architecture, Biography, History, Letters & Correspondence

  • Winnipeg’s Great War

    A City Comes of Age

    Jim Blanchard (Author)

    Winnipeg’s Great War picks up in 1914, just as the city is regrouping after a brief economic downturn. War comes unexpectedly, thoughts of recovery are abandoned, and the city digs in for a hard-fought four years. Using letters, diaries, and newspaper reports, Jim Blanchard brings us into the homes and public offices of Winnipeg and its citizens to illustrate the profound effect the war had on every aspect of the city, from its politics and economy, to its men on the battlefield and its war-weary families fighting on the homefront.

    Published September 2010 | History, Letters & Correspondence, Military History, Social History, Urban Studies

  • Families, Lovers, and their Letters

    Italian Postwar Migration to Canada

    Sonia Cancian (Author)

    Families, Lovers, and their Letters takes us into the passionate hearts and minds of ordinary people caught in the heartbreak of transatlantic migration. It examines the experiences of Italian migrants to Canada and their loved ones left behind in Italy following the Second World War, when the largest migration of Italians to Canada took place.

    Published May 2010 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History, Immigration, Letters & Correspondence

  • Travelling Passions

    The Hidden Life of Vilhjalmur Stefansson

    Gisli Palsson (Author), Keneva Kunz (Translator)

    Vilhjalmur Stefansson has long been known for his groundbreaking work as an anthropologist and expert on Arctic peoples. His three expeditions to the Canadian Arctic in the early 1900s, as well as his expertise in northern anthropology, helped create his public image as an heroic, Hemingway-esque figure in the annals of twentieth-century exploration. Travelling Passions sheds new light on Stefanssonís life and work, focussing on the tension between his private life and the theories that brought his name to the halls of fame.

    Published September 2005 | Biography, History, Letters & Correspondence

  • Alien Heart

    The Life and Work of Margaret Laurence

    Lyall Powers (Author)

    Margaret Laurence remains one of Canada’s best-known and most beloved writers. Twice winner of the Governor General’s Award for fiction, she was, as the late William French wrote, “more profoundly admired than any other Canadian novelist of her generation.” Alien Heart is the first full-length biography of Margaret Laurence that combines personal knowledge and insights of the woman with a study of her work, which often paralleled the events and concerns in her own life.

    Published August 2005 | Biography, Letters & Correspondence, Literary Criticism

  • Intimate Strangers

    The Letters of Margaret Laurence and Gabrielle Roy

    Margaret Laurence (Author), Gabrielle Roy (Author), Paul G. Socken (Editor)

    In 1976 Margaret Laurence and Gabrielle Roy began a seven-year correspondence in English, when both were at the height of their powers as writers. In these lovely and intimate letters, two great Canadian writers discuss everything from their common prairie backgrounds to current politics and censorship.

    Published December 2004 | Letters & Correspondence, Literary Criticism

  • Icelanders in North America

    The First Settlers

    Jonas Thor (Author)

    During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands of Icelanders emigrated to both North and South America. Although the best known Icelandic settlements were in southern Manitoba, in the area that became known as “New Iceland,” Icelanders also established important settlements in Brazil, Minnesota, Utah, Wisconsin, Washington, Saskatchewan, and Nova Scotia. Earlier accounts of this immigration have tended to concentrate on the history of New Iceland. Using letters, Icelandic and English periodicals and newspapers, census reports, and archival repositories, Jonas Thor expands this view by looking at Icelandic immigration from a continent-wide perspective.

    Published November 2002 | Ethnic Studies, History, Icelandic Studies, Immigration, Letters & Correspondence

  • The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870

    Laura Peers (Author)

    Among the most dynamic Aboriginal peoples in western Canada today are the Ojibwa, who have played an especially vital role in the development of an Aboriginal political voice at both levels of government. Yet, they are relative newcomers to the region, occupying the parkland and prairies only since the end of the 18th century. This work traces the origins of the western Ojibwa, their adaptations to the West, and the ways in which they have coped with the many challenges they faced in the first century of their history in that region, between 1780 and 1870.

    Published October 1994 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence

  • As Long as the Rivers Run

    Hydroelectric Development and Native Communities

    James B. Waldram (Author)

    Waldram examines the politics of hydroelectric dam construction in the Canadian northwest, focussing on the negotiations and agreements between the developers and the Native residents. He shows the parallels between the treatment of Natives by the government of Canada in these negotiations and the treaty process a century earlier.

    Published October 1993 | Decolonization, Environmental Studies, Indigenous Studies, Letters & Correspondence, Resource Management