Events

Dec
03

Meshake and Anderson in Kitchener-Waterloo

Tuesday, December 3rd 2019

Please join Third Age Learning KW for a presentation by Rene Meshake and Kim Anderson called “Injichaag: Storytelling and the Soul of an Indigenous Artist” as part of Third Age KW’s Fall 2019 Tuesday Series—Indigenous Perspectives: Paths to Understanding.

Date: Tuesday, December 3, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Location: Forbes Family Room, Manulife Financial Sportsplex (RIM Park, 2001 University Ave E), Waterloo
Cost: $5/6.25/8 (more details on ticket pricing here…)

In this presentation, Anishinaabe Elder and artist Rene Meshake will share stories related to his recently launched book Injichaag: My Soul in Story. This work was done in collaboration with Metis scholar Kim Anderson, who will speak about the process of working with story and in particular how Meshake’s story fits in the context of a larger narrative of Indigenous peoples in Canada throughout the twentieth century. The two will perform and read from their collaborative work, which includes history, story, poetry and Anishinaabe (Ojibway) word bundles.

Rene Meshake is an Anishinaabe Elder, storyteller, visual and performing artist, award-winning author, flute player, multimedia artist and a Recipient of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee Medal. By blending Anishinaabe and English words into his performances, he communicates his spiritual heritage and poetics. His education includes: Creative Writing from the Humber School for Writers, Anishinaabe oral tradition, language, arts and culture. He has an active on-line presence as a Funky-Elder.

Kim Anderson is a Metis writer and educator, working as an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition at the University of Guelph. Dr. Anderson holds a PhD in history and is a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Relationships. Her books include A Recognition of Being: Reconstruction Native Womanhood, Life Stages and Native Women: Memory, Teachings and Story Medicine and Keetsahnak: Our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Sisters.

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