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Decolonization

Settler City Limits

Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West

Heather Dorries (Editor), Robert Henry (Editor), David Hugill (Editor) + others

While cities like Winnipeg, Minneapolis, Saskatoon, Rapid City, Edmonton, Missoula, Regina, and Tulsa are places where Indigenous marginalization has been most acute, they have also long been sites of Indigenous placemaking and resistance to settler colonialism.

Unbecoming Nationalism

From Commemoration to Redress in Canada

Helene Vosters (Author)

Helene Vosters examines an eclectic range of both state-sponsored social memory projects and counter-memorial projects to reveal and unravel the threads connecting reverential military commemoration, celebratory cultural nationalism, and white settler-colonial nationalism.

Implicating the System

Judicial Discourses in the Sentencing of Indigenous Women

Elspeth Kaiser-Derrick (Author)

Indigenous women continue to be overrepresented in Canadian prisons. Implicating the System demonstrates how their overincarceration and often extensive experiences of victimization are interconnected with and through ongoing processes of colonization.

Towards a New Ethnohistory

Community-Engaged Scholarship among the People of the River

Keith Thor Carlson (Editor), John Sutton Lutz (Editor), David M. Schaepe (Editor) + others

Community-engaged scholarship invites members of the Indigenous community themselves to identify the research questions, host the researchers while they conduct the research, and participate meaningfully in the analysis of the researchers’ findings.

The Clay We Are Made Of

Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on the Grand River

Susan M. Hill (Author)

If one seeks to understand Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) history, one must consider the history of Haudenosaunee land. For countless generations prior to European contact, land and territory informed Haudenosaunee thought and philosophy, and was a primary determinant of Haudenosaunee identity.

A Land Not Forgotten

Indigenous Food Security and Land-Based Practices in Northern Ontario

Michael A. Robidoux (Editor), Courtney W. Mason (Editor)

Food insecurity takes a disproportionate toll on the health of Canada’s Indigenous people. A Land Not Forgotten examines the disruptions in local food practices as a result of colonization and the cultural, educational, and health consequences of those disruptions.

A National Crime (2nd Edition)

The Canadian Government and the Residential School System

John S. Milloy (Author), Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Foreword)

A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

Indigenous Homelessness

Perspectives from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

Evelyn Peters (Editor), Julia Christensen (Editor), Paul Andrew (Contributor) + others

Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands.

Report of an Inquiry into an Injustice

Begade Shutagot'ine and the Sahtu Treaty

Peter Kulchyski (Author)

"A Report of an Inquiry into an Injustice" weaves together stories of law, politics, culture and everyday life to create an incisive and often poetic examination of the lives of the Begade Shutagot’ine. This book bears eloquent witness to the Begade Shutagot’ine people’s assertion that they have never ceded their aboriginal or territorial rights.

A Knock on the Door

The Essential History of Residential Schools from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Edited and Abridged

Phil Fontaine (Foreword), Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (Author), Aimée Craft (Afterword)

A Knock on the Door gathers material from the several reports the TRC has produced to present the essential history and legacy of residential schools in a concise and accessible package that includes new materials to help inform and contextualize the journey to reconciliation that Canadians are now embarked upon.

Indigenous Men and Masculinities

Legacies, Identities, Regeneration

Robert Alexander Innes (Editor), Kim Anderson (Editor), Warren Cariou (Interviewee) + others

What do we know of masculinities in non-patriarchal societies? Indigenous peoples of the Americas and beyond come from traditions of gender equity, complementarity, and the sacred feminine, concepts that were unimaginable and shocking to Euro-western peoples at contact.

This Benevolent Experiment

Indigenous Boarding Schools, Genocide, and Redress in Canada and the United States

Andrew Woolford (Author)

At the end of the nineteenth century, Indigenous boarding schools were touted as the means for solving the “Indian problem” in both Canada and the United States. The genocidal project inherent in these boarding schools, however, did not unfold in either nation without diversion, resistance, and unintended consequences.

Rekindling the Sacred Fire

Métis Ancestry and Anishinaabe Spirituality

Chantal Fiola (Author)

Why don’t more Métis people go to traditional ceremonies? How does going to ceremonies impact Métis identity?

Finding a Way to the Heart

Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women's History in Canada

Jarvis Brownlie (Editor), Valerie J. Korinek (Editor)

Finding a Way to the Heart examines race, gender, identity, and colonization from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century, and illustrates Sylvia Van Kirk’s extensive influence on a generation of feminist scholarship.

Life Stages and Native Women

Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine

Kim Anderson (Author), Maria Campbell (Foreword)

A rare and inspiring guide to the health and well-being of Indigenous women and their communities.

When the Other is Me

Native Resistance Discourse, 1850-1990

Emma LaRocque (Author)

In this long-awaited book from one of the most recognized and respected scholars in Native Studies today, Emma LaRocque presents a powerful interdisciplinary study of the Native literary response to racist writing in the Canadian historical and literary record from 1850 to 1990.

Sigurjon Baldur Hafsteinsson (Editor), Marian Bredin (Editor)

Indigenous media challenges state power, erodes communication monopolies, and illuminates government threats to Indigenous cultural, social, economic, and political sovereignty. Its effectiveness in these areas, however, is hampered by government control of broadcast frequencies, licensing, and legal limitations over content and ownership.

Taking Back Our Spirits

Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing

Jo-Ann Episkenew (Author)

Taking Back Our Spirits traces the link between Canadian public policies, the injuries they have inflicted on Indigenous people, and Indigenous literature’s ability to heal individuals and communities.