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Ethnic Studies

Reconstructions of Canadian Identity

Towards Diversity and Inclusion

Vander Tavares (Editor), Maria João Maciel Jorge (Editor)

In 1971, Canada became the first nation in the world to officially declare its bilingual and multicultural policies. This incisive collection examines what has changed over the past fifty years, highlighting the lived experiences of minoritized Canadians and offering insights into the critical work that lies ahead.

Laughing Back at Empire

The Grassroots Activism of The Asianadian Magazine, 1978–1985

Angie Wong (Author)

Laughing Back at Empire is a groundbreaking examination of The Asianadian, one of Canada’s first anti-racist, anti-sexist, and anti-homophobic magazines. Wong’s work amplifies Asian Canadian voices that speak, shout, and laugh together at empire’s self-congratulatory and exclusionary narratives.

Gifts from Amin

Ugandan Asian Refugees in Canada

Shezan Muhammedi (Author)

The first major oral history project dedicated to the stories of Ugandan Asian refugees in Canada, Gifts from Amin explores the historical context of their 1972 expulsion from Uganda, the multiple motivations behind Canada’s decision to admit them, and their resilience over the past fifty years.

Being German Canadian

History, Memory, Generations

Alexander Freund (Editor)

Being German Canadian explores how multi-generational families and groups have interacted and shaped each other’s integration and adaptation in Canadian society, focusing on the experiences, histories, and memories of German immigrants and their descendants.

Distorted Descent

White Claims to Indigenous Identity

Darryl Leroux (Author)

Distorted Descent examines a social phenomenon that has taken off in the twenty-first century: otherwise white, French descendant settlers in Canada shifting into a self-defined “Indigenous” identity.

Communal Solidarity

Immigration, Settlement, and Social Welfare in Winnipeg’s Jewish Community, 1882–1930

Arthur Ross (Author)

Arthur Ross’s study of the formation of Winnipeg’s Jewish community is not only the first history of the societies, institutions, and organizations Jewish immigrants created, it reveals how communal solidarity shaped their understanding of community life and the way decisions should be made about their collective future.

Jan Raska (Author)

Jan Raska’s Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada explores how these newcomers joined or formed ethnocultural organizations to help in their attempts to affect developments in Czechoslovakia and Canadian foreign policy towards their homeland.

Horse-and-Buggy Genius

Listening to Mennonites Contest the Modern World

Royden Loewen (Author)

The history of the twentieth century is one of modernization, a story of old ways being left behind. Many traditionalist Mennonites rejected these changes, especially the automobile, which they regarded as a symbol of pride and individualism. They became known as a “horse-and-buggy” people.

After Identity

Mennonite Writing in North America

Robert Zacharias (Editor), Ervin Beck (Contributor), Di Brandt (Contributor) + others

After Identity: Mennonite Writing in North America offers a cohesive platform for an interdisciplinary reappraisal of Mennonite literature and literary criticism, as well as a reflection of current conversations in the field about Mennonite literary discourse and cultural identity.

Holocaust Survivors in Canada

Exclusion, Inclusion, Transformation, 1947-1955

Adara Goldberg (Author)

In the decade after the Second World War, 35,000 Jewish survivors of Nazi persecution and their dependants arrived in Canada. This was a watershed moment in Canadian Jewish history. Goldberg reveals the challenges in responding to, and recovering from, genocide from the perspective of “new Canadians” themselves.

Transnational Radicals

Italian Anarchists in Canada and the U.S., 1915-1940

Travis Tomchuk (Author)

Italian anarchism emerged in the latter half of the nineteenth century, during that country’s long and bloody unification. Often facing economic hardship and political persecution, many of Italy’s anarchists migrated to North America. Transnational Radicals examines the transnational anarchist movement that existed in Canada and the United States.

Invisible Immigrants

The English in Canada since 1945

Marilyn Barber (Author), Murray Watson (Author)

Despite being one of the largest immigrant groups contributing to the development of modern Canada, the story of the English has been all but untold. In Invisible Immigrants, Barber and Watson document the experiences of English-born immigrants who chose to come to Canada during England’s last major wave of emigration.

The Showman and the Ukrainian Cause

Folk Dance, Film, and the Life of Vasile Avramenko

Orest T. Martynowych (Author)

Young, Well-Educated, and Adaptable

Chilean Exiles in Ontario and Quebec, 1973-2010

Francis Peddie (Author), Royden Loewen (Series Editor)

The Search for a Socialist El Dorado

Finnish Immigration from the United States and Canada to Soviet Karelia in the 1930s

Alexey Golubev (Author), Irina Takala (Author)

The untold story of the founding and subsequent destruction of a Finnish socialist community in the Soviet Union.

Rewriting the Break Event

Mennonites and Migration in Canadian Literature

Robert Zacharias (Author)

Drawing on recent work in diaspora studies, Rewriting the Break Event offers a historicization of Mennonite literary studies in Canada, followed by close readings of five novels that rewrite the Mennonite break event through specific strains of emphasis, including a religious narrative, ethnic narrative, trauma narrative, and meta-narrative.

Ethnic Elites and Canadian Identity

Japanese, Ukrainians, and Scots, 1919-1971

Aya Fujiwara (Author)

In Ethnic Elites and Canadian Identity, Aya Fujiwara examines the roles of Japanese, Ukrainian, and Scottish elites during the transition of Canadian identity from Anglo-conformity to ethnic pluralism, placing the emergence of Canadian multiculturalism within a transnational context.

Community and Frontier

A Ukrainian Settlement in the Canadian Parkland

John C. Lehr (Author)

University of Manitoba Press is grateful for the support it receives for its publishing program from the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund; the Canada Council for the Arts; the Manitoba Department of Culture, Heritage, and Tourism; the Manitoba Arts Council; and the Aid to Scholarly Publishing Programme.