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Social History

Pursuing Play

Women’s Leisure in Small-Town Ontario, 1870–1914

Rebecca Beausaert (Author)

In telling the story of what small-town women did for fun while navigating social hierarchies, nurturing ties of kinship and friendship, and advancing community development, Pursuing Play adds a new dimension to Canadian histories of gender, leisure, and popular culture.

The Art of Ectoplasm

Encounters with Winnipeg's Ghost Photographs

Serena Keshavjee (Editor)

The Art of Ectoplasm reflects on the history and legacy of T.G. and Lillian Hamilton's extraordinary collection of paranormal photographs, which have inspired and perplexed academics, historians, and artists since their creation a century ago, and offers a compelling look at a chapter in social history not entirely unlike our own.

For a Better World

The Winnipeg General Strike and the Workers' Revolt

James Naylor (Editor), Rhonda L. Hinther (Editor), Jim Mochoruk (Editor)

Canada’s most famous example of class conflict, the Winnipeg General Strike, redefined conversations around class, politics, region, ethnicity, and gender. For a Better World interrogates types of commemoration, current legacies of the Strike, and its ongoing influence.

Undressed Toronto

From the Swimming Hole to Sunnyside, How a City Learned to Love the Beach, 1850–1935

Dale Barbour (Author)

Undressed Toronto challenges assumptions about class, the urban environment, and the presentation of the naked body in five Toronto environments.

Grasslands Grown

Creating Place on the U.S. Northern Plains and Canadian Prairies

Molly P. Rozum (Author)

An exploration of modern regionalism and senses of place developing among generations of settler colonial society on North America’s northern grasslands.

Being German Canadian

History, Memory, Generations

Alexander Freund (Editor)

Being German Canadian explores how multi-generational families and groups have interacted and shaped each other’s integration and adaptation in Canadian society, focusing on the experiences, histories, and memories of German immigrants and their descendants.

Bruce Erickson (Editor), Sarah Wylie Krotz (Editor)

Popularly thought of as a recreational vehicle and one of the key ingredients of an ideal wilderness getaway, the canoe is also a political vessel. The Politics of the Canoe expands and enlarges the stories that we tell about the canoe’s relationship to colonialism, nationalism, environmentalism, and resource politics.

Authorized Heritage

Place, Memory, and Historic Sites in Prairie Canada

Robert Coutts (Author)

Authorized Heritage examines how governments became the mediators of what is heritage and, just as significantly, what is not.

Did You See Us?

Reunion, Remembrance, and Reclamation at an Urban Indian Residential School

Andrew Woolford (Editor), Survivors of the Assiniboia Indian Residential School (Author)

The Assiniboia school was the first residential high school in Manitoba and one of the only residential schools in Canada to be located in a large urban setting. These recollections of Assiniboia at times diverge, but together exhibit Survivor resilience and the strength of the relationships that bond them to this day.

Compelled to Act

Histories of Women's Activism in Western Canada 

Sarah Carter (Editor), Nanci Langford (Editor)

Compelled to Act showcases fresh historical perspectives on the diversity of women’s contributions to social and political change in prairie Canada in the 20th century, including but looking beyond the era of suffrage activism.

Pathways of Reconciliation

Indigenous and Settler Approaches to Implementing the TRC's Calls to Action

Aimée Craft (Editor), Paulette Regan (Editor)

Recognizing that reconciliation is not only an ultimate goal, but a decolonizing process of journeying in ways that embody everyday acts of resistance, resurgence, and solidarity, Pathways of Reconciliation helps readers concerned about how to respond to the TRC of Canada’s Calls to Action find their way forward.

Civilian Internment in Canada

Histories and Legacies

Rhonda L. Hinther (Editor), Jim Mochoruk (Editor)

Civilian Internment in Canada initiates a conversation about not only internment, but also about the laws and procedures—past and present—which allow the state to disregard the basic civil liberties of some of its most vulnerable citizens.

Settler City Limits

Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West

Heather Dorries (Editor), Robert Henry (Editor), David Hugill (Editor) + others

While cities like Winnipeg, Minneapolis, Saskatoon, Rapid City, Edmonton, Missoula, Regina, and Tulsa are places where Indigenous marginalization has been most acute, they have also long been sites of Indigenous placemaking and resistance to settler colonialism.

A Diminished Roar

Winnipeg in the 1920s

Jim Blanchard (Author)

The third instalment in Jim Blanchard’s popular history of early Winnipeg, A Diminished Roar guides readers through the prairie city in 1920s, a decade of political and social turmoil.

No Man's Land

The Life and Art of Mary Riter Hamilton, 1868-1954

Kathryn A. Young (Author), Sarah M. McKinnon (Author)

The life story of artist Mary Riter Hamilton (1868-1954) is one of tragedy and adventure, from homestead beginnings, to genteel drawing rooms in Winnipeg, Victoria and Vancouver, to Berlin and Parisian art schools, to Vimy and Ypres, and finally to illness and poverty. No Man’s Land is the first biographical study of Hamilton.

The North End Revisited

Photographs by John Paskievich

John Paskievich (Author), Stephen Osborne (Introduction), George Melnyk (Text) + others

Cities and the people who live in them are enduring subjects of photography. Winnipeg’s North End is one of North America’s iconic neighbourhoods, a place where the city’s unique character and politics have been forged.

Snacks

A Canadian Food History

Janis Thiessen (Author)

Through extensive oral history and archival research, Thiessen uncovers the roots of our deep loyalties to different snack foods, what it means to be an independent snack food producer, and the often-quirky ways snacks have been created and marketed.

A National Crime (2nd Edition)

The Canadian Government and the Residential School System

John S. Milloy (Author), Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Foreword)

A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Indigenous children.