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Contemporary Studies on the North

Contemporary Studies on the North will publish books that expand our understanding of Canada’s North and its position within the circumpolar region. Focussing on new research, this series will incorporate multidisciplinary studies on northern peoples, cultures, geographies, histories, politics, religions, and economies. Particular emphasis will be placed on works by and about Inuit and First Nations that redefine historical and contemporary issues in the North. (ISSN 1928-1722)

Series Editor: Christopher Trott, University of Manitoba

I Will Live for Both of Us

A History of Colonialism, Uranium Mining, and Inuit Resistance

Joan Scottie (Author), Warren Bernauer (Author), Jack Hicks (Author)

Joan Scottie's I Will Live for Both of Us is a reflection on recent political and environmental history and a call for a future in which Inuit traditional laws and values are respected and upheld.

Words of the Inuit

A Semantic Stroll through a Northern Culture

Louis-Jacques Dorais (Author), Lisa Koperqualuk (Preface)

Words of the Inuit is an important compendium of Inuit culture illustrated through Inuit words. It brings the sum of the author’s decades of experience and engagement with Inuit and Inuktitut to bear on what he fashions as an amiable, leisurely stroll through words and meanings.

Nitinikiau Innusi

I Keep the Land Alive

Tshaukuesh Elizabeth Penashue (Author), Elizabeth Yeoman (Editor)

Labrador Innu cultural and environmental activist Tshaukuesh Elizabeth Penashue is well-known both within and far beyond the Innu Nation. The recipient of a National Aboriginal Achievement Award and an honorary doctorate from Memorial University, she has been a subject of documentary films, books, and numerous articles.

Inuit Stories of Being and Rebirth

Gender, Shamanism, and the Third Sex

Bernard Saladin d'Anglure (Author), Peter Frost (Translator), Claude Lévi-Strauss (Foreword)

As explained through first-person accounts and traditional legends, myths, and folk tales, the presence of transgender individuals informs Inuit relationships to one another and to the world at large, transcending the dualities of male and female, human and animal, human and spirit.

Report of an Inquiry into an Injustice

Begade Shutagot'ine and the Sahtu Treaty

Peter Kulchyski (Author)

"A Report of an Inquiry into an Injustice" weaves together stories of law, politics, culture and everyday life to create an incisive and often poetic examination of the lives of the Begade Shutagot’ine. This book bears eloquent witness to the Begade Shutagot’ine people’s assertion that they have never ceded their aboriginal or territorial rights.

Sanaaq

An Inuit Novel

Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk (Author), Bernard Saladin d'Anglure (Introduction), Peter Frost (Translator)

The first novel written in Inuttitut syllabics, Sanaaq is an intimate story of an Inuit family negotiating the changes brought into their community by the coming of the qallunaat, the white people, in the mid-nineteenth century.

Stories in a New Skin

Approaches to Inuit Literature

Keavy Martin (Author)

A groundbreaking introduction to Inuit literary criticism.

David C. Natcher (Editor), Lawrence Felt (Editor), Andrea Procter (Editor)

Comprised of twelve essays, the book examines the way of life and cultural survival of Inuit from communities throughout northern and central Labrador, including: social economy of wildfood production, forced relocations and land claims, subsistence and settlement patterns, and issues around climate change, urban planning, and self-government.

Like the Sound of a Drum

Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut

Peter Kulchyski (Author)

In Like the Sound of a Drum, Peter Kulchyski looks as three northern communities—Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut—and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence.