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Oral History & Storytelling

Bead Talk

Indigenous Knowledge and Aesthetics from the Flatlands

Carmen L. Robertson (Editor), Judy Anderson (Editor), Katherine Boyer (Editor)

Beading fosters traditional methods of teaching and learning and enables intergenerational transmissions of pattern and skill. These conversations, interviews, essays, and full-colour reproductions of artwork from expert and emerging artists, academics, and curators from the prairies invite us all into the beading circle.

mmm... Manitoba

The Stories Behind the Foods We Eat

Kimberley Moore (Author), Janis Thiessen (Author)

Mixing recipes, maps, archival records, biographies, and full-colour photographs with fascinating stories, mmm... Manitoba showcases the province’s diverse foodways and industries from on board the Manitoba Food History Truck.

Stored in the Bones

Safeguarding Indigenous Living Heritages

Agnieszka Pawłowska-Mainville (Author)

Stored in the Bones enriches discussions of treaty rights, land claims, and environmental policy. Presenting an international framework that may be used to advance community interests in dealings with governments, the study offers a pathway for Indigenous peoples to document intangible cultural heritage.

E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake) (Author), Joe Capilano (Sahp-luk) (Author), Mary Agnes Capilano (Lixwelut) (Author) + others

Legends of the Capilano updates E. Pauline Johnson’s 1911 classic Legends of Vancouver, restoring Johnson’s intended title for the first time, and celebrating the storytelling abilities of Johnson’s Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) collaborators, Joe and Mary Capilano.

Establishing Shots

An Oral History of the Winnipeg Film Group

Kevin Nikkel (Author)

Both a deep dive into the life of an internationally renowned institution and an exploration of the growth of an experimental film movement, this collection of interviews produces a vibrant picture of the Winnipeg Film Group’s origins, successes, failures, and ongoing impact.

Gifts from Amin

Ugandan Asian Refugees in Canada

Shezan Muhammedi (Author)

The first major oral history project dedicated to the stories of Ugandan Asian refugees in Canada, Gifts from Amin explores the historical context of their 1972 expulsion from Uganda, the multiple motivations behind Canada’s decision to admit them, and their resilience over the past fifty years.

Recipes and Reciprocity

Building Relationships in Research

Hannah Tait Neufeld (Editor), Elizabeth Finnis (Editor)

Recipes and Reciprocity considers the ways that food and research intersect for researchers, participants, and communities, demonstrating how everyday acts around food preparation, consumption, and sharing can enable unexpected approaches to reciprocal research and fuel relationships across cultures, generations, and places.

Exactly What I Said

Translating Words and Worlds

Elizabeth Yeoman (Author)

Examining what it means to relate whole worlds across the boundaries of language, culture, and history, Exactly What I Said offers an accessible, engaging reflection on respectful and responsible translation and collaboration.

Mennonite Farmers

A Global History of Place and Sustainability

Royden Loewen (Author)

A comparative world-scale environmental history, Mennonite Farmers is a pioneering work that brings faith into conversation with the land in distinctive ways.

Returning to Ceremony

Spirituality in Manitoba Métis Communities

Chantal Fiola (Author)

Returning to Ceremony is the follow-up to Chantal Fiola’s award-winning Rekindling the Sacred Fire and continues her ground-breaking examination of Métis spirituality. Among the Métis, Fiola asserts, spirituality exists on a continuum of Indigenous and Christian traditions, and Métis spirituality includes ceremonies.

Dadibaajim

Returning Home through Narrative

Helen Olsen Agger (Author)

Dadibaajim examines that history of encroaching settlement and dispossession as it reasserts the voices and presence of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg too long ignored for the convenience of settler society.

Dammed

The Politics of Loss and Survival in Anishinaabe Territory

Brittany Luby (Author)

Dammed explores Canada’s hydroelectric boom in the Lake of the Woods area. It complicates narratives of increasing affluence in postwar Canada, revealing that the inverse was true for Indigenous communities along the Winnipeg River.

Detroit's Hidden Channels

The Power of French-Indigenous Families in the Eighteenth Century

Karen L. Marrero (Author)

A study of the integral role of early French and Indigenous kinship networks in Detroit’s development as a site of singular political and economic importance in the continental interior.

Injichaag: My Soul in Story

Anishinaabe Poetics in Art and Words

Rene Meshake (Author), Kim Anderson (With)

This book shares the life story of Anishinaabe artist Rene Meshake in stories, poetry, and Anishinaabemowin “word bundles” that serve as a dictionary of Ojibwe poetics.

Jan Raska (Author)

Jan Raska’s Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada explores how these newcomers joined or formed ethnocultural organizations to help in their attempts to affect developments in Czechoslovakia and Canadian foreign policy towards their homeland.

Towards a New Ethnohistory

Community-Engaged Scholarship among the People of the River

Keith Thor Carlson (Editor), John Sutton Lutz (Editor), David M. Schaepe (Editor) + others

Community-engaged scholarship invites members of the Indigenous community themselves to identify the research questions, host the researchers while they conduct the research, and participate meaningfully in the analysis of the researchers’ findings.

Snacks

A Canadian Food History

Janis Thiessen (Author)

Through extensive oral history and archival research, Thiessen uncovers the roots of our deep loyalties to different snack foods, what it means to be an independent snack food producer, and the often-quirky ways snacks have been created and marketed.

The Clay We Are Made Of

Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on the Grand River

Susan M. Hill (Author)

If one seeks to understand Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) history, one must consider the history of Haudenosaunee land. For countless generations prior to European contact, land and territory informed Haudenosaunee thought and philosophy, and was a primary determinant of Haudenosaunee identity.