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Literature

E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake) (Author), Joe Capilano (Sahp-luk) (Author), Mary Agnes Capilano (Lixwelut) (Author) + others

Legends of the Capilano updates E. Pauline Johnson’s 1911 classic Legends of Vancouver, restoring Johnson’s intended title for the first time, and celebrating the storytelling abilities of Johnson’s Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) collaborators, Joe and Mary Capilano.

Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir (Editor), Höskuldur Thráinsson (Editor), Úlfar Bragason (Editor)

Icelandic Heritage in North America offers an in-depth examination of Icelandic immigrant identity, linguistic evolution, and legacy.

Injichaag: My Soul in Story

Anishinaabe Poetics in Art and Words

Rene Meshake (Author), Kim Anderson (With)

This book shares the life story of Anishinaabe artist Rene Meshake in stories, poetry, and Anishinaabemowin “word bundles” that serve as a dictionary of Ojibwe poetics.

Vera Manuel (Author), Michelle Coupal (Editor), Deanna Reder (Editor) + others

This critical edition delivers a unique and comprehensive collection of the works of Ktunaxa-Secwepemc writer and educator Vera Manuel, daughter of prominent Indigenous leaders Marceline Paul and George Manuel.

Sovereign Traces, Volume 1

Not (Just) (An)Other

Gordon Henry Jr. (Editor), Elizabeth LaPensée (Editor)

Sovereign Traces: Not (Just) (An)Other merges works by contemporary writers such as Gordon Henry Jr., Gerald Vizenor, Warren Cariou, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Richard Van Camp, and Gwen Westerman with imaginative illustrations by U.S. and Canadian artists.

Mini Aodla Freeman (Author), Keavy Martin (Editor), Julie Rak (Editor)

Mini Aodla Freeman’s extraordinary story, sometimes humourous and sometimes heartbreaking, illustrates an Inuit woman’s movement between worlds and ways of understanding. This critical edition includes an afterword by Keavy Martin and Julie Rak, with Norma Dunning.

Indians Don't Cry

Gaawiin Mawisiiwag Anishinaabeg

George Kenny (Author), Renate Eigenbrod (Afterword), Patricia M. Ningewance (Translator)

An important piece of Indigenous literature republished with a new Anishinaabe translation by Patricia M. Ningewance. This new edition will inspire a new generation of Anishinaabe writers with poems and stories that depict the challenges of Indigenous people confronting and finding ways to live within urban settler society.

Sanaaq

An Inuit Novel

Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk (Author), Bernard Saladin d'Anglure (Introduction), Peter Frost (Translator)

The first novel written in Inuttitut syllabics, Sanaaq is an intimate story of an Inuit family negotiating the changes brought into their community by the coming of the qallunaat, the white people, in the mid-nineteenth century.

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies

Understanding the World Through Stories

Jill Doerfler (Editor), Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (Editor), Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair (Editor)

This groundbreaking anthology features twenty-four contributors who utilize creative and critical approaches to propose that this people’s stories carry dynamic answers to questions posed within Anishinaabeg communities, nations, and the world at large.

Arapaho Historical Traditions

Hinono'einoo3itoono

Alonzo Moss, Sr. (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator)

Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. Here, for the first time, these outstanding examples of Arapaho accounts are printed in their original language but made accessible to a wider audience through English translation and an Arapaho-English glossary.

Making it Home

Place in Canadian Literature

Deborah Keahey (Author)

Kirsten Wolf (Translator)

This collection of short stories and poems spans 75 years of writings. From the hopefulness of the early immigration in the 1870s to the conflict of assimilation in the 1950s, the pieces reflect a range of experiences common to immigrant women from many cultures.

Kirsten Wolf (Translator), Arny Hjaltadottir (Translator)

This selection of Western Icelandic writings, the first of its kind in English, represents a wide collection of first and second generation Icelandic-Canadian authors.

The Dog's Children

Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams

Leonard Bloomfield (Editor), John D. Nichols (Editor)