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Linguistics

Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir (Editor), Höskuldur Thráinsson (Editor), Úlfar Bragason (Editor)

Icelandic Heritage in North America offers an in-depth examination of Icelandic immigrant identity, linguistic evolution, and legacy.

mitoni niya nêhiyaw / Cree is Who I Truly Am

nêhiyaw-iskwêw mitoni niya / Me, I am Truly a Cree Woman

Sarah Whitecalf (As told by), H.C. Wolfart (Editor and Translator), Freda Ahenakew (Editor and Translator) + others

In presenting a Cree woman’s view of her world, the texts in this volume directly reflect the spoken word: Sarah Whitecalf’s memoirs are here printed in Cree exactly as she recorded them, with a close English translation on the facing page. They constitute an autobiography of great personal authority and rare authenticity.

Words of the Inuit

A Semantic Stroll through a Northern Culture

Louis-Jacques Dorais (Author), Lisa Koperqualuk (Preface)

Words of the Inuit is an important compendium of Inuit culture illustrated through Inuit words. It brings the sum of the author’s decades of experience and engagement with Inuit and Inuktitut to bear on what he fashions as an amiable, leisurely stroll through words and meanings.

Sounds of Ethnicity

Listening to German North America, 1850 - 1914

Barbara Lorenzkowski (Author)

Drawing connections between immigrant groups in Buffalo, New York, and Kitchener, Ontario, Barbara Lorenzkowski examines the interactions of German-language education, choral groups, and music festivals and their roles in creating both an ethnic sense of self and opportunities for cultural exchanges at the local, ethnic, and transnational levels.

North American Icelandic

The Life of a Language

Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir (Author)

This book outlines the nature and development of North American Icelandic, detailing the social and linguistic constraints of this language’s phonology.

Arapaho Historical Traditions

Hinono'einoo3itoono

Alonzo Moss, Sr. (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator)

Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. Here, for the first time, these outstanding examples of Arapaho accounts are printed in their original language but made accessible to a wider audience through English translation and an Arapaho-English glossary.

They Knew Both Sides of Medicine

Cree Tales of Curing and Cursing Told by Alice Ahenakew

H.C. Wolfart (Translator), Freda Ahenakew (Translator)

Written in original Cree text with a full English translation, They Knew both Sides of Medicine also includes an introduction discussing the historical background of the narrative and its style and rhetorical structure, as well as a complete Cree-English glossary.

Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw (As told by), Freda Ahenakew (Editor), H.C. Wolfart (Editor)

Jim Ka-Nipitehtew was a respected Cree Elder from Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, who spoke only Cree and provided these original counselling discourses. The book offers the speeches in Cree syllabics and in Roman Orthography as well as an English translation and commentary.

The Dog's Children

Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams

Leonard Bloomfield (Editor), John D. Nichols (Editor)

Stories of the House People

Told by Peter Vandall and Joe Douquette

Freda Ahenakew (Author)

The Cree Language is Our Identity

the La Ronge lectures of Sarah Whitecalf

Sarah Whitecalf (Author), H.C. Wolfart (Editor), Freda Ahenakew (Editor)