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Critical Studies in Native History

Critical Studies in Native History publishes books committed to new ways of thinking and writing about the historical experience of Indigenous people. (ISSN 1925-5888)

Succeeds the Manitoba Studies in Native History series.

Series Editor: Jarvis Brownlie, University of Manitoba

Dadibaajim

Returning Home through Narrative

Helen Olsen Agger (Author)

Dadibaajim examines that history of encroaching settlement and dispossession as it reasserts the voices and presence of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg too long ignored for the convenience of settler society.

Dammed

The Politics of Loss and Survival in Anishinaabe Territory

Brittany Luby (Author)

Dammed explores Canada’s hydroelectric boom in the Lake of the Woods area. It complicates narratives of increasing affluence in postwar Canada, revealing that the inverse was true for Indigenous communities along the Winnipeg River.

The Clay We Are Made Of

Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on the Grand River

Susan M. Hill (Author)

If one seeks to understand Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) history, one must consider the history of Haudenosaunee land. For countless generations prior to European contact, land and territory informed Haudenosaunee thought and philosophy, and was a primary determinant of Haudenosaunee identity.

A National Crime (2nd Edition)

The Canadian Government and the Residential School System

John S. Milloy (Author), Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Foreword)

A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

Sounding Thunder

The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow

Brian D. McInnes (Author), Waubgeshig Rice (Foreword)

Stories from Canada’s most decorated Indigenous soldier.

A Two-Spirit Journey

The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder

Ma-Nee Chacaby (Author), Mary Louisa Plummer (With)

"A Two-Spirit Journey" is Ma-Nee Chacaby’s extraordinary account of her life as an Ojibwa-Cree lesbian. From her early, often harrowing memories of life and abuse in a remote Ojibwa community riven by poverty and alcoholism, Chacaby’s story is one of enduring and ultimately overcoming the social, economic, and health legacies of colonialism.

Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Author)

A modern history of Indigenous labour in the Canadian workforce.

Elder Brother and the Law of the People

Contemporary Kinship and Cowessess First Nation

Robert Alexander Innes (Author)

An entirely new way of viewing Aboriginal cultural indentity on the northern plains.

Life Stages and Native Women

Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine

Kim Anderson (Author), Maria Campbell (Foreword)

A rare and inspiring guide to the health and well-being of Indigenous women and their communities.