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Decolonization

Bead Talk

Indigenous Knowledge and Aesthetics from the Flatlands

Carmen L. Robertson (Editor), Judy Anderson (Editor), Katherine Boyer (Editor)

Beading fosters traditional methods of teaching and learning and enables intergenerational transmissions of pattern and skill. These conversations, interviews, essays, and full-colour reproductions of artwork from expert and emerging artists, academics, and curators from the prairies invite us all into the beading circle.

Reconstructions of Canadian Identity

Towards Diversity and Inclusion

Vander Tavares (Editor), Maria João Maciel Jorge (Editor)

In 1971, Canada became the first nation in the world to officially declare its bilingual and multicultural policies. This incisive collection examines what has changed over the past fifty years, highlighting the lived experiences of minoritized Canadians and offering insights into the critical work that lies ahead.

Engraved on Our Nations

Indigenous Economic Tenacity

Wanda Wuttunee (Editor), Fred Wien (Editor)

This first-of-its-kind collection shares stories not only of entrepreneurial excellence and persistence but of savvy leadership, innovation, and reciprocity, providing hope to Indigenous business leaders, youth, and elected officials working on the front lines to improve economic conditions and achieve “a good life” for their communities.

School of Racism

A Canadian History, 1830–1915

Catherine Larochelle (Author), S.E. Stewart (Translator)

This award-winning book names the ways in which Canada’s education system has supported ideologies of white supremacy—ideologies so deeply embedded that they still linger in school texts and programming today. School of Racism bridges English- and French-Canadian histories to deliver a better understanding of Canada’s identity.

Plundering the North

A History of Settler Colonialism, Corporate Welfare, and Food Insecurity

Kristin Burnett (Author), Travis Hay (Author)

Plundering the North provides fresh insight into Canada’s colonial project, laying bare the processes behind the chronic food insecurity experienced by northern Indigenous communities by charting the social, economic, and political changes that have taken place in northern Ontario since the 1950s.

Stored in the Bones

Safeguarding Indigenous Living Heritages

Agnieszka Pawłowska-Mainville (Author)

Stored in the Bones enriches discussions of treaty rights, land claims, and environmental policy. Presenting an international framework that may be used to advance community interests in dealings with governments, the study offers a pathway for Indigenous peoples to document intangible cultural heritage.

Reclaiming Anishinaabe Law

Kinamaadiwin Inaakonigewin and the Treaty Right to Education

Leo Baskatawang (Author), Jim Daschuk (Foreword)

Baskatawang envisions a hopeful future for Indigenous nations where their traditional laws are formally recognized and affirmed by the governments of Canada. Baskatawang thereby details the efforts being made in Treaty #3 territory to revitalize and codify the Anishinaabe education law, kinamaadiwin inaakonigewin.

I Will Live for Both of Us

A History of Colonialism, Uranium Mining, and Inuit Resistance

Joan Scottie (Author), Warren Bernauer (Author), Jack Hicks (Author)

Joan Scottie's I Will Live for Both of Us is a reflection on recent political and environmental history and a call for a future in which Inuit traditional laws and values are respected and upheld.

Aboriginal TM

The Cultural and Economic Politics of Recognition

Jennifer Adese (Author)

Aboriginal™ explores the origins, meaning, and usage of the term “Aboriginal” and its displacement by the word “Indigenous.” More than legal vernacular, the term has had real-world consequences for the people it defined. Adese offers insight into Indigenous-Canada relations and Indigenous identity, authenticity, and agency.

In Our Backyard

Keeyask and the Legacy of Hydroelectric Development

Aimée Craft (Editor), Jill Blakley (Editor)

In Our Backyard tells the story of the Keeyask dam and accompanying development on the Nelson River from the perspective of Indigenous peoples, academics, scientists, and regulators.

Nancy Van Styvendale (Editor), J.D. McDougall (Editor), Robert Henry (Editor) + others

The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-Being demonstrates the healing possibilities of Indigenous works of art, literature, film, and music from a diversity of Indigenous peoples and arts traditions.

Returning to Ceremony

Spirituality in Manitoba Métis Communities

Chantal Fiola (Author)

Returning to Ceremony is the follow-up to Chantal Fiola’s award-winning Rekindling the Sacred Fire and continues her ground-breaking examination of Métis spirituality. Among the Métis, Fiola asserts, spirituality exists on a continuum of Indigenous and Christian traditions, and Métis spirituality includes ceremonies.

Dadibaajim

Returning Home through Narrative

Helen Olsen Agger (Author)

Dadibaajim examines that history of encroaching settlement and dispossession as it reasserts the voices and presence of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg too long ignored for the convenience of settler society.

Inventing the Thrifty Gene

The Science of Settler Colonialism

Travis Hay (Author), Teri Redsky Fiddler (Afterword)

Inventing the Thrifty Gene exposes the exploitative nature of settler science with Indigenous subjects, the flawed scientific theories stemming from faulty assumptions of Indigenous decline and disappearance, as well as the severe inequities in Canadian health care that persist even today.

Authorized Heritage

Place, Memory, and Historic Sites in Prairie Canada

Robert Coutts (Author)

Authorized Heritage examines how governments became the mediators of what is heritage and, just as significantly, what is not.

Did You See Us?

Reunion, Remembrance, and Reclamation at an Urban Indian Residential School

Andrew Woolford (Editor), Survivors of the Assiniboia Indian Residential School (Author)

The Assiniboia school was the first residential high school in Manitoba and one of the only residential schools in Canada to be located in a large urban setting. These recollections of Assiniboia at times diverge, but together exhibit Survivor resilience and the strength of the relationships that bond them to this day.

Decolonizing Discipline

Children, Corporal Punishment, Christian Theologies, and Reconciliation

Valerie E. Michaelson (Editor), Joan E. Durrant (Editor)

Decolonizing Discipline is a multifaceted exploration of theological debates, scientific evidence, and personal journeys of the violence that permeated Canada’s Residential Schools and continues in Canadian homes today. Together, they compel us to decolonize discipline in Canada.

Ubuntu Relational Love

Decolonizing Black Masculinities

Devi Dee Mucina (Author)

Drawing on anti-racist, African feminist, and Ubuntu theories and critically influenced by Indigenous masculinities scholarship in Canada, Ubuntu Relational Love is a powerful and engaging book.