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Translation

Exactly What I Said

Translating Words and Worlds

Elizabeth Yeoman (Author)

Examining what it means to relate whole worlds across the boundaries of language, culture, and history, Exactly What I Said offers an accessible, engaging reflection on respectful and responsible translation and collaboration.

Inuit Stories of Being and Rebirth

Gender, Shamanism, and the Third Sex

Bernard Saladin d'Anglure (Author), Peter Frost (Translator), Claude Lévi-Strauss (Foreword)

As explained through first-person accounts and traditional legends, myths, and folk tales, the presence of transgender individuals informs Inuit relationships to one another and to the world at large, transcending the dualities of male and female, human and animal, human and spirit.

Sounding Thunder

The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow

Brian D. McInnes (Author), Waubgeshig Rice (Foreword)

Stories from Canada’s most decorated Indigenous soldier.

Andrew Dennis (Translator), Peter Foote (Translator), Richard Perkins (Translator)

The laws of Medieval Iceland provide detailed and fascinating insight into the society that produced the Icelandic sagas. Known collectively as Gragas (Greygoose), this great legal code offers a wealth of information about early European legal systems and the society of the Middles Ages.

My Parents

Memoirs of New World Icelanders

Birna Bjarnadottir (Editor), Finnbogi Gudmundsson (Editor)

A rare first-hand look into the lives of New World immigrants of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Jon Johannesson (Author), Haraldur Bessason (Translator)

This pioneering work of historiography provides a comprehensive history of Iceland from 870 A.D. to the end of the Commonwealth in 1262.

Arapaho Historical Traditions

Hinono'einoo3itoono

Alonzo Moss, Sr. (Author), Andrew Cowell (Translator)

Told by Paul Moss (1911-1995), these twelve texts introduce us to an immensely rich literature. Here, for the first time, these outstanding examples of Arapaho accounts are printed in their original language but made accessible to a wider audience through English translation and an Arapaho-English glossary.

They Knew Both Sides of Medicine

Cree Tales of Curing and Cursing Told by Alice Ahenakew

H.C. Wolfart (Translator), Freda Ahenakew (Translator)

Written in original Cree text with a full English translation, They Knew both Sides of Medicine also includes an introduction discussing the historical background of the narrative and its style and rhetorical structure, as well as a complete Cree-English glossary.

Andrew Dennis (Translator), Peter Foote (Translator)

From the Inside Out

The Rural Worlds of Mennonite Diarists

Royden Loewen (Editor)

Jim Kâ-Nîpitêhtêw (As told by), Freda Ahenakew (Editor), H.C. Wolfart (Editor)

Jim Ka-Nipitehtew was a respected Cree Elder from Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, who spoke only Cree and provided these original counselling discourses. The book offers the speeches in Cree syllabics and in Roman Orthography as well as an English translation and commentary.

Kirsten Wolf (Translator)

This collection of short stories and poems spans 75 years of writings. From the hopefulness of the early immigration in the 1870s to the conflict of assimilation in the 1950s, the pieces reflect a range of experiences common to immigrant women from many cultures.

Kirsten Wolf (Translator), Arny Hjaltadottir (Translator)

This selection of Western Icelandic writings, the first of its kind in English, represents a wide collection of first and second generation Icelandic-Canadian authors.

The Dog's Children

Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams

Leonard Bloomfield (Editor), John D. Nichols (Editor)

Stories of the House People

Told by Peter Vandall and Joe Douquette

Freda Ahenakew (Author)

The Cree Language is Our Identity

the La Ronge lectures of Sarah Whitecalf

Sarah Whitecalf (Author), H.C. Wolfart (Editor), Freda Ahenakew (Editor)