Books – Women’s Studies

  • Imperial Plots

    Women, Land, and the Spadework of British Colonialism on the Canadian Prairies

    Sarah Carter (Author)

    Longing for land of their own.

    Published October 2016 | History, Social History, Women’s Studies

  • Indigenous Women, Work, and History

    1940–1980

    Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Author)

    A modern history of Indigenous labour in the Canadian workforce.

    Published May 2014 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Finding a Way to the Heart

    Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

    Robin Jarvis Brownlie (Editor), Valerie J. Korinek (Editor)

    Provocative reflections on a generation of feminist scholarship.

    Published April 2012 | Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Life Stages and Native Women

    Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine

    Kim Anderson (Author)

    A rare and inspiring guide to the health and well-being of Aboriginal women and their communities.

    Published September 2011 | Critical Studies in Native History, History, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Restoring the Balance

    First Nations Women, Community, and Culture

    Eric Guimond (Editor), Gail Guthrie Valaskakis (Editor), Madeline Dion Stout (Editor)

    Restoring the Balance brings to light the work First Nations women have performed, and continue to perform, in cultural continuity and community development. It illustrates the challenges and successes they have had in the areas of law, politics, education, community healing, language, and art, while suggesting significant options for sustained improvement of individual, family, and community well-being.

    Published November 2008 | Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Mennonite Women in Canada

    A History

    Marlene Epp (Author)

    Mennonite Women in Canada traces the complex social history and multiple identities of Canadian Mennonite women over 200 years. Marlene Epp explores women’s roles, as prescribed and as lived, within the contexts of immigration and settlement, household and family, church and organizational life, work and education, and in response to social trends and events.

    Published October 2008 | Studies in Immigration and Culture, Ethnic Studies, History, Women’s Studies

  • A Great Restlessness

    The Life and Politics of Dorise Nielsen

    Faith Johnston (Author)

    Dorise Nielsen was a pioneering feminist, a radical politician, the first Communist elected to Canada’s House of Commons, and the only woman elected in 1940. But despite her remarkable career, until now little has been known about her.

    Published October 2006 | History, Political Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Making Ends Meet

    Farm Women’s Work in Manitoba

    Charlotte van de Vorst (Author)

    Based on hundreds of interviews with Manitoba farm men and women, Making Ends Meet reconstructs the common history shared by modern farm women as well as by their mothers and grandmothers. It explores women’s changing roles on the farm, from the early days of the Red River settlement to the twentieth-century farm community.

    Published December 2002 | History, Women’s Studies

  • In Her Own Voice

    Childbirth Stories from Mennonite Women

    Katherine Martens (Author)

    Winnipeg writer Katherine Martens interviewed 26 women from the Mennonite community in southern Manitoba, ranging in age from 22 to 88 years old. In the privacy of their kitchens and parlours, over sociable cups of tea, they share with Martens their private fears and joys about what was often seen as a rite of passage into responsible adulthood, and they recalled that childbirth could be a difficult and, at times, traumatic event, but it could also be a radiant and spiritual experience.

    Published May 1997 | Ethnic Studies, Women’s Studies

  • Writings by Western Icelandic Women

    Kirsten Wolf (Translator)

    This collection of short stories and poems spans 75 years of writings. It includes translated work by little-known authors such as Undina, “a modest poet,” as well as works in English by prominent writers such as Laura Goodman Salverson, twice a winner of the Governor-General’s Award. From the hopefulness of the early immigration in the 1870s to the conflict of assimilation in the 1950s, the pieces reflect a range of experiences common to immigrant women from many cultures.

    Published January 1997 | Icelandic Studies, Women’s Studies