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Lives Lived, Lives Imagined

Landscapes of Resilience in the Works of Miriam Toews

Sabrina Reed (Author)

Lives Lived, Lives Imagined is a timely examination of Miriam Toews’s oeuvre and a celebration of fiction’s ability to simultaneously embody compassion and anger, joy and sadness, and to brave the personal and communal oppressions of politics, religion, family, society, and mental illness.

Aboriginal TM

The Cultural and Economic Politics of Recognition

Jennifer Adese (Author)

Aboriginal™ explores the origins, meaning, and usage of the term “Aboriginal” and its displacement by the word “Indigenous.” More than legal vernacular, the term has had real-world consequences for the people it defined. Adese offers insight into Indigenous-Canada relations and Indigenous identity, authenticity, and agency.

For a Better World

The Winnipeg General Strike and the Workers' Revolt

James Naylor (Editor), Rhonda L. Hinther (Editor), Jim Mochoruk (Editor)

Canada’s most famous example of class conflict, the Winnipeg General Strike, redefined conversations around class, politics, region, ethnicity, and gender. For a Better World interrogates types of commemoration, current legacies of the Strike, and its ongoing influence.

Gifts from Amin

Ugandan Asian Refugees in Canada

Shezan Muhammedi (Author)

The first major oral history project dedicated to the stories of Ugandan Asian refugees in Canada, Gifts from Amin explores the historical context of their 1972 expulsion from Uganda, the multiple motivations behind Canada’s decision to admit them, and their resilience over the past fifty years.

Recipes and Reciprocity

Building Relationships in Research

Hannah Tait Neufeld (Editor), Elizabeth Finnis (Editor)

Recipes and Reciprocity considers the ways that food and research intersect for researchers, participants, and communities, demonstrating how everyday acts around food preparation, consumption, and sharing can enable unexpected approaches to reciprocal research and fuel relationships across cultures, generations, and places.

Medicare's Histories

Origins, Omissions, and Opportunities in Canada

Esyllt W. Jones (Editor), James Hanley (Editor), Delia Gavrus (Editor)

As COVID lays bare social inequities and the inadequacies of health care delivery and public health, Medicare's Histories shows what was excluded and what was—and is—possible in health care.

Exactly What I Said

Translating Words and Worlds

Elizabeth Yeoman (Author)

Examining what it means to relate whole worlds across the boundaries of language, culture, and history, Exactly What I Said offers an accessible, engaging reflection on respectful and responsible translation and collaboration.

In Our Backyard

Keeyask and the Legacy of Hydroelectric Development

Aimée Craft (Editor), Jill Blakley (Editor)

In Our Backyard tells the story of the Keeyask dam and accompanying development on the Nelson River from the perspective of Indigenous peoples, academics, scientists, and regulators.

Nancy Van Styvendale (Editor), J.D. McDougall (Editor), Robert Henry (Editor) + others

The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-Being demonstrates the healing possibilities of Indigenous works of art, literature, film, and music from a diversity of Indigenous peoples and arts traditions.

Mennonite Farmers

A Global History of Place and Sustainability

Royden Loewen (Author)

A comparative world-scale environmental history, Mennonite Farmers is a pioneering work that brings faith into conversation with the land in distinctive ways.

Returning to Ceremony

Spirituality in Manitoba Métis Communities

Chantal Fiola (Author)

Returning to Ceremony is the follow-up to Chantal Fiola’s award-winning Rekindling the Sacred Fire and continues her ground-breaking examination of Métis spirituality. Among the Métis, Fiola asserts, spirituality exists on a continuum of Indigenous and Christian traditions, and Métis spirituality includes ceremonies.

Dadibaajim

Returning Home through Narrative

Helen Olsen Agger (Author)

Dadibaajim examines that history of encroaching settlement and dispossession as it reasserts the voices and presence of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg too long ignored for the convenience of settler society.

Undressed Toronto

From the Swimming Hole to Sunnyside, How a City Learned to Love the Beach, 1850–1935

Dale Barbour (Author)

Undressed Toronto challenges assumptions about class, the urban environment, and the presentation of the naked body in five Toronto environments.

Inventing the Thrifty Gene

The Science of Settler Colonialism

Travis Hay (Author), Teri Redsky Fiddler (Afterword)

Inventing the Thrifty Gene exposes the exploitative nature of settler science with Indigenous subjects, the flawed scientific theories stemming from faulty assumptions of Indigenous decline and disappearance, as well as the severe inequities in Canadian health care that persist even today.

Grasslands Grown

Creating Place on the U.S. Northern Plains and Canadian Prairies

Molly P. Rozum (Author)

An exploration of modern regionalism and senses of place developing among generations of settler colonial society on North America’s northern grasslands.

Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future

The Legacy of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

Katherine Graham (Editor), David Newhouse (Editor)

Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future examines the foundational work of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) and the legacy of its 1996 report. It assesses the Commission’s influence on subsequent milestones in Indigenous-Canada relations and considers our prospects for a constructive future.

Being German Canadian

History, Memory, Generations

Alexander Freund (Editor)

Being German Canadian explores how multi-generational families and groups have interacted and shaped each other’s integration and adaptation in Canadian society, focusing on the experiences, histories, and memories of German immigrants and their descendants.

Daniels v. Canada

In and Beyond the Courts

Nathalie Kermoal (Editor), Chris Andersen (Editor)

In Daniels v. Canada, the Supreme Court determined that Métis and non-status Indians were “Indians” under section 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867. This volume demonstrates the importance of understanding “law” beyond its jurisprudential manifestations.